Are cloud based solutions effective against DDoS attacks?

MGaluzzi

The options for protecting against DDoS attacks basically comes down to a hardware based or cloud based solution. Hardware is the traditional way and if utilized properly it is effective, but it can also be very expensive. Do the cloud based options perform as well and offer the same level of protection?

Tags: DDoS, security
Answer this Question

Answers

2 total
rcook12
Vote Up (6)

The cloud based option is going to cost less and require less expertise to deploy. It’s like racing, if you ride a Ducati but don’t know what you are doing, you are still going to lose. With the cloud based option, you are going to have people monitoring the situation that (hopefully) know what they are doing, since THIS is what they do. It’s going to take more capital, expertise and personnel to go the hardware route, but for a large company with a strong IT staff it could be the better option. Here is a link to an interview with the CTO from DOSarrest, a company that specializes in cloud based solutions. Obviously he has some bias, but there is still some good general information in the article. 

 

 

jimlynch
Vote Up (5)

Blocking DDoS attacks with a cloud-based solution
http://www.net-security.org/article.php?id=1991

"In this interview, Jag Bains, CTO of DOSarrest, talks about various types of DDoS attacks and why a cloud-based solution is a good fit for most organizations."

Ask a question

Join Now or Sign In to ask a question.
To fill out its cloud services portfolio with policy and auditing controls, Ericsson is acquiring a majority stake in San Francisco enterprise services company Apcera.
Microsoft's playing off iOS 8 upgrade woes by offering to double your free OneDrive storage space--but only if you act fast.
The release of Delve, the first application to use Microsoft's Office Graph machine learning engine, will be remembered years from now as either the genesis of a revolutionary technology or as a fireworks-style launch that dazzled everyone only for a brief moment.
There's a new top dog in terms of contributions to OpenStack.
SAP is buying business-travel and expense software vendor Concur for about US$8.3 billion, in a bid to continue growing out its portfolio of cloud-based applications.
It's the end of an era at Oracle, as CEO Larry Ellison has been appointed executive chairman and CTO of the vendor, with co-presidents Safra Catz and Mark Hurd named co-CEOs.
Dropbox makes a series of improvements to its datastore API, including shared datastores, local datastores, and better webhooks.
Partnership will load Canonical's OpenStack on AMD's SeaMicro servers.
Microsoft is poised to release a major update to its Dynamics CRM and marketing applications in a bid to gain market share against rivals such as Salesforce.com.
Journalists, nurses and plumbers are among those who drink more coffee than people in technology
randomness