Are cloud based solutions effective against DDoS attacks?

MGaluzzi

The options for protecting against DDoS attacks basically comes down to a hardware based or cloud based solution. Hardware is the traditional way and if utilized properly it is effective, but it can also be very expensive. Do the cloud based options perform as well and offer the same level of protection?

Tags: DDoS, security
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rcook12
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The cloud based option is going to cost less and require less expertise to deploy. It’s like racing, if you ride a Ducati but don’t know what you are doing, you are still going to lose. With the cloud based option, you are going to have people monitoring the situation that (hopefully) know what they are doing, since THIS is what they do. It’s going to take more capital, expertise and personnel to go the hardware route, but for a large company with a strong IT staff it could be the better option. Here is a link to an interview with the CTO from DOSarrest, a company that specializes in cloud based solutions. Obviously he has some bias, but there is still some good general information in the article. 

 

 

jimlynch
Vote Up (4)

Blocking DDoS attacks with a cloud-based solution
http://www.net-security.org/article.php?id=1991

"In this interview, Jag Bains, CTO of DOSarrest, talks about various types of DDoS attacks and why a cloud-based solution is a good fit for most organizations."

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