Does the Cloud need better PR for consumer acceptance?

ncharles

Some people in the media are questioning whether or not "the Cloud" has become a dirty phrase, after all the highly public and humbling security lapses at Amazon.com, Dropbox.com, and at Sony's Playstation Network. Are consumers afraid of the Cloud? Should there be a national or international licensing authority to give the Cloud more credibility?

Tags: cloud, pr, security
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4 total
tomhenderson
Vote Up (27)

No.

Cloud has to be secured as well as any other asset infrastructure. Check with providers to determine which organization does this-- helps you secure your infrastructure.

Consumers have no idea what the cloud is. If you're talking about SaaS, they don't understand much of it. Amazon is IaaS, Dropbox is a cloud storage provider, and Sony's PSN is SaaS.

In Amazon's case, I believe they out thought themselves, and caused a cascading failure. In Dropbox's case, it was poorly tested code. In Sony's case, it was unmitigated stupidity compounded by false bravado and poorly executed procedural security. This is said in my opinion. How many other sites (today: Booz Allen Hamilton) get hacked? Only the ones where a rigorous approach to security isn't employed.

lbloom
Vote Up (22)

I'm not convinced that the Cloud is mainstream yet, even though Microsoft and Apple have been promoting the Cloud for a while now. People I know seem pretty happy with Amazon.com and Netflix which have cloud service offerings. The real trick is for companies to show some innovation when it comes to promoting cloud services. Calling things "Cloud"-anything could be used to simplify in the mind where or how the service is delivered, but in its best form, customers won't see, hear, or think about the cloud - it should be just part of the infrastructure, like ELECTRICITY. 

jimlynch
Vote Up (17)

I don't think consumers are afraid, it might be more a case of just not understanding what value the cloud has to offer them. Many people simply don't pay much attention to such things, so it's hard to sell it to them.

I think the cloud has to offer real value in order for consumers to latch onto it. If it delivers useful services then it has the potential to bring in large volumes of consumer dollars. Perhaps Apple's iCloud will achieve that at some point.

sandeepseeram
Vote Up (13)

As cloud computing is achieving increased popularity, concerns are being voiced about the security issues introduced through adoption of this new model. The effectiveness and efficiency of traditional protection mechanisms are being reconsidered as the characteristics of this innovative deployment model can differ widely from those of traditional architectures.

 

 

Sandeep Seeram

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