Should work critical applications ever be cloud based?

ttopp

I suspect a lot of other people are asking themselves this question after Adobe Creative Cloud was down for over a day. There are a lot of people that missed deadlines because of this, and Adobe forced the subscription, cloud-only model on everyone so there was no fall-back unless you have physical copies of the older software versions. I depend on Google Docs quite a bit, but they have some offline capabilities. Isn't the cloud a poor fit for mission critical applications? If so, why would Adobe CC force everyone into a cloud only model? 

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jimlynch
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It depends, do the advantages of the cloud outweigh the possible disadvantages? Only you can decide if they do. Once you've made that decision you can then find the most reliable cloud vendor available if you decide to go with cloud-based applications.

jluppino
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I’d say the the Adobe Creative Cloud outage makes the point that the cloud is not appropriate for mission critical applications. However, it is cheaper for companies like Adobe, lets them make more money over time using a subscription based model, and they can control piracy in a way that was impossible with software on physical media. So it is all wins for companies locking you into a cloud only application, but it leaves customers in a lurch when something goes wrong. How many thousands of work hours were lost because of the Adobe CC outage? I don’t know, but I’m sure it was a lot.

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