What do cloud storage providers do with my data?

zane

I've been told to ask about this, but what kind of response should I expect, and what should raise a red flag?

Answer this Question

Answers

4 total
jnaze
Vote Up (20)

According to a cloud FAQ by Rackspace:

Most providers track generic information on all customers for billing and performance logging purposes – not what’s actually in your files. Before you find out the hard way, make sure that’s all they’re doing with your data. The fine print may give them the right to sell your contact information for marketing purposes or give them access to make account changes based on data utilization.

Read the full FAQ here:
http://www.rackspace.com/cloud/blog/2011/10/13/10-questions-to-ask-befor...

jimlynch
Vote Up (19)

Here's a good article that has questions you should ask before trusting cloud providers:

Five questions to ask before trusting your data to Amazon or other storage cloud provider
http://www.networkworld.com/supp/2008/ndc3/051908-cloud-storage-five-que...

Derren Brown
Vote Up (13)

Hello Friends,

Passwords can be hacked. This doesn't mean that passwords aren't safe, just that they're vulnerable to dictionary and brute force attacks, as described in our article How Hackers Work. If you choose a cloud storage solution that relies on a password to access your data, choose a password that's difficult to hack with dictionary attacks, and change your password often to reduce the chances of success from brute force attacks.
Passwords can be hacked. This doesn't mean that passwords aren't safe, just that they're vulnerable to dictionary and brute force attacks, as described in our article How Hackers Work. If you choose a cloud storage solution that relies on a password to access your data, choose a password that's difficult to hack with dictionary attacks, and change your password often to reduce the chances of success from brute force attacks.

Thanks and Regards,
Derren Brown

transcriptionhub.com

Agili Ron
Vote Up (12)

Hello Friends,

Cloud computing is the use of computing resources (hardware and software) that are delivered as a service over a network (typically the Internet). The name comes from the use of a cloud-shaped symbol as an abstraction for the complex infrastructure it contains in system diagrams. Cloud computing entrusts remote services with a user's data, software and computation.
In the business model using software as a service, users are provided access to application software and databases. The cloud providers manage the infrastructure and platforms on which the applications run. SaaS is sometimes referred to as “on-demand software” and is usually priced on a pay-per-use basis. SaaS providers generally price applications using a subscription fee.
Proponents claim that the SaaS allows a business the potential to reduce IT operational costs by outsourcing hardware and software maintenance and support to the cloud provider. This enables the business to reallocate IT operations costs away from hardware/software spending and personnel expenses, towards meeting other IT goals. In addition, with applications hosted centrally, updates can be released without the need for users to install new software. One drawback of SaaS is that the users' data are stored on the cloud provider’s server. As a result, there could be unauthorized access to the data.

Thanks and Regards,
Agili Ron

agiliron.com

Ask a question

Join Now or Sign In to ask a question.
In response to a query from Vint Cerf, professional developers explain why they don’t feel a membership in the Association for Computing Machinery is worth the cost
Microsoft and IBM are gaining momentum in the cloud infrastructure services market, putting pressure on Amazon and outpacing rival Google, according to a new study.
A network testbed being constructed just south of San Francisco will help carriers and vendors develop standards for better cloud services, the CloudEthernet Forum says.
Managed cloud service offers alternative to DIY or WAN optimization appliances.
IT leaders need to learn how to manage the evolving legal, privacy and compliance issues of SMAC contracts.
California is moving its IT services to a cloud, on-demand, subscription-based service that state officials believe may meet as much as 80% of its computing needs.
Microsoft has begun boosting the free allowance of its OneDrive cloud-based storage service to one terabyte for subscribers to consumer and college student Office 365 plans.
IBM is offering a potentially powerful incentive in its attempts to entice organizations to move supercomputing jobs to the cloud: a high-speed network communications link called InfiniBand.
Businesses don't have to use Sprint's network or even Android devices.
Dropbox will continue beefing up the business version of its cloud storage and file sharing service, adding security features to shared links, full-text search capabilities and new tools for enterprise developers.