What is unique about Oracle's new public cloud?

jack12

It seems that every other word that Larry Ellison said during this week's press conference about its new cloud offering was "unique". What does Oracle bring to cloud services that is unique or new?

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blackdog
Vote Up (13)

I think the main thing that makes it unique is Larry Ellison is talking about it.  He is not the most modest guy, which I suppose you would expect from the CEO of a huge corporation.  Basically, the main thing I got from Ellison's talk is that he is concerned about SAP, because he couldn't seem to say enough negative about it.  Funny thing is that Oracle is dropping support for its ERP software to push enterprise to move to the cloud, while at the same time giving SAP grief for.....uh, supporting it's BusinessSuite.

 

It's easy to allow an abrasive personality to influence your opinion of a company, and in fairness it sounds like Oracle is pushing out a well rounded cloud model with some solid SaaS options.  But I don't see much, if anything, that is unique about it.  I see a derivative model that looks well executed.   

jimlynch
Vote Up (9)

For those who aren't familiar with Oracle's offering, here's a news article with details:

Oracle Unveils Suites of Cloud Services to Compete With Salesforce, SAP
http://cloudtimes.org/2012/06/09/oracle-cloud-services-salesforce-sap/

Oracle has officially launched its public cloud market, Oracle Cloud, thus entering a segment that has long shunned by the world’s number two software major and the world’s largest database maker.

Oracle CEO Larry Ellison has introduced suites of cloud services including Oracle Cloud Social Services, a business social platform, Oracle Cloud Platform Services and Oracle Application Services. All these solutions are fully managed, hosted and supported by Oracle.

Ellison said the cloud services are nothing more and nothing less and are “the most comprehensive cloud on planet earth.”

“After nearly seven years of continuous development and innovation, strategic acquisitions and a billion investments we introduce the most comprehensive cloud world,” said Ellison. “Most cloud vendors have only partial solutions. They do not have platforms that are expanding. Oracle is the only vendor that offers a complete suite of modern, social enabled applications, which are available on a standards-based platform.”

Oracle Cloud will include more than 100 applications and the services comprise technologies of Fusion business applications and online programs from Oracle acquired companies Taleo Corp. and RightNow Technologies Inc."

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