Which characters are not allowed for file names in SkyDrive?

jluppino

I sometimes get an error message when I try to upload files to SkyDrive/OneDrive that says “the file name contains characters that are not allowed.” Ok, I’m fine with that, but it doesn’t tell me which characters are forbidden. Other than trial and error, is there any way to tell which characters are not allowed by SkyDrive?

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mandril
Vote Up (7)

The file name contains characters that aren't allowed. Change its name so that it doesn’t begin or end with a space, end with a period, or include any of these characters: / \ < > : * " ? |

 

These names aren't allowed for files or folders: AUX, PRN, NUL, CON, COM0, COM1, COM2, COM3, COM4, COM5, COM6, COM7, COM8, COM9, LPT0, LPT1, LPT2, LPT3, LPT4, LPT5, LPT6, LPT7, LPT8, LPT9

 

http://windows.microsoft.com/en-us/onedrive/upload-file-cant-faq

Laura
Vote Up (4)

I am agree with mandril. According to the Microsoft support forum, the maximum filename length for Skydrive is 230 characters. Yours being 77, I doubt that is the problem. Are you sure there isn't a space at the end of the filename? 

jimlynch
Vote Up (3)

Mandril has the right answer to this, see his link to the OneDrive Help page.

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