What downsides have you experienced from overclocking a server?

henyfoxe

Have you seen significant negative effects from overclocking? Overall, considering the costs/benefits, is it worthwhile to overclock a server, or are there enough drawbacks to keep from doing it?

Answer this Question

Answers

2 total
jimlynch
Vote Up (14)

I would proceed with caution if you decide to overclock. It may affect the warranty and/or life of some of your computer's components. It may also generate significant extra heat.

What exactly would you hope to get out of overclocking a server? I doubt the performance difference would be worth the risk. Perhaps buying a new server might work better? Different software? Upgrading your server's components?

Good luck if you decide to do it.

dblacharski
Vote Up (13)

I don't have experience with overclocking servers, but it stands to reasons that you would have the same issues that I've seen from overclocking desktop PCs. The most obvious downside is that you may damage your CPU. Increased heat is going to result from overclocking, and you will have to address it, whether through heatsinks, or increased ventilation or both. If you are experiencing any heat issues currently, they will be magnified when you overclock. Another common issue I experienced was lack of stability with high system bus speeds. I faced all too many BSODs playing around with overclocking, although you can sometimes regain some stability by altering the refresh rate of memory from BIOS. I've also burned chips by pushing the stock voltage rating too far - generally 0.3 volts over stock is as far as I could go without ending up with a burned chip.

Most of the problems I've experience over the years have probably been from pushing overclocking too far, but generally I was doing it with borderline obsolete equipment that was expendable. Done carefully and conservatively, I'm sure that the results would be more positive. But even so, you are always taking a bit of a risk with overclocking.

Ask a question

Join Now or Sign In to ask a question.
A new 2,000-sq.-ft. data center in Pennsylvania was designed to protect against an electromagnetic pulse, either from a solar storm or a nuclear event.
Tesla expects to use geothermal, wind and solar to achieve 100% renewable energy production.
Mayo clinicians will leverage Watson's natural language processing and data analytics capabilities.
New protocols will replace a 16-year-old standard that's way out of date.
Web server administrators who wish to trim bandwidth costs and hasten the delivery of their Web pages should take a look at a newly updated free module from Google designed to automate a number of techniques used to compress content.
Cisco this week revamped its UCS server line with systems designed to scale form the largest cloud deployment to those with only up to 15 servers.
U.S. data centers use more electricity than they need, a new report finds, and IT managers are too cautious about managing power and businesses are unwilling to invest in energy conservation.
U.S. data centers use more electricity than they need, a new report finds, and IT managers are too cautious about managing power and businesses are unwilling to invest in energy conservation.
With the Chinese government turning up the heat on foreign IT vendors, citing security concerns, IBM is finding help from an unlikely source: a competitor, local server vendor Inspur.
Tesla Motors and other manufacturers have set their sites on achieving lower lithium-ion battery costs through economies of scale, which should enable power storage systems for solar energy.
Join us:
Facebook

Twitter

Pinterest

Tumblr

LinkedIn

Google+