MSOffice2003 to MSOffice - what?

BudProg

I have used MSOffice 2003 Professional almost since it was first available in the UK, and understand its support is to close next year.
I have written quite a lot of VBA code to support programs in Word, Excel, PowerPoint and particularly Access.
Is it likely that this code will transfer into any more recent MSOffice suite, and which one should I choose?
As a retired Programmer, I don't have too much cash, but would wish to continue supporting the Programs I do have available without having to rewrite (and test) everything all over again.
I have Windows7 Professional with a smallish Desktop available.
Any advice would be useful - other than 'Give Up'! Thank you.

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jimlynch
Vote Up (10)

You might check the Microsoft Office support/developer section on Microsoft's site. I suspect that other developers might be in the same boat as you. That's probably your best bet to get a clear answer on this.

ttopp
Vote Up (6)

I'm not a programmer, so I don't have too much to contribute. However, when I was checking Windows 8 compatibility with older programs, I noticed Office 2003 had an "X" beside it indicating that it wasn't compatible with the newest version of Windows. I'm just speculating, but this may suggest that it will take a lot of work on your part to make Office 2003 programs compatible with the new Office. I might be wrong though, and hopefully I am. Good luck!

 

http://www.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/compatibility/win8/CompatCenter/H...

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