MSOffice2003 to MSOffice - what?

BudProg

I have used MSOffice 2003 Professional almost since it was first available in the UK, and understand its support is to close next year.
I have written quite a lot of VBA code to support programs in Word, Excel, PowerPoint and particularly Access.
Is it likely that this code will transfer into any more recent MSOffice suite, and which one should I choose?
As a retired Programmer, I don't have too much cash, but would wish to continue supporting the Programs I do have available without having to rewrite (and test) everything all over again.
I have Windows7 Professional with a smallish Desktop available.
Any advice would be useful - other than 'Give Up'! Thank you.

Answer this Question

Answers

2 total
jimlynch
Vote Up (13)

You might check the Microsoft Office support/developer section on Microsoft's site. I suspect that other developers might be in the same boat as you. That's probably your best bet to get a clear answer on this.

ttopp
Vote Up (10)

I'm not a programmer, so I don't have too much to contribute. However, when I was checking Windows 8 compatibility with older programs, I noticed Office 2003 had an "X" beside it indicating that it wasn't compatible with the newest version of Windows. I'm just speculating, but this may suggest that it will take a lot of work on your part to make Office 2003 programs compatible with the new Office. I might be wrong though, and hopefully I am. Good luck!

 

http://www.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/compatibility/win8/CompatCenter/H...

Ask a question

Join Now or Sign In to ask a question.
Want to Google the name of a restaurant in English and then ask for the weather in Japanese? On Android it no longer requires switching back and forth between language settings.
Cloud computing isn't just for the enterprise; it's likely to bring big changes to small businesses too, survey finds.
Is social media in general and Twitter in particular speeding up the news cycle?
Twitter said late Tuesday it will remove images and videos of deceased people upon the request of family members, but it put conditions on the policy.
A tricked-out version of YouTube offering exclusive content might prove lucrative bait for Google to lure some of its users deeper into its digital video and music services.
Uber has hired David Plouffe, a former campaign manager for President Obama with deep ties to the White House, to help it enter new markets and bolster its fight against taxi competitors.
Nearly all of Facebook's outbound notification emails are now encrypted while traveling the Internet, a collaborative feat that comes from the technology industry's push to thwart the NSA's spying programs.
A new study reveals that Java developers make the most while JavaScript programmers are the most wanted
Facebook is experimenting with a new feature that may help you determine that the story you saw is, in fact, an attempt at humor.
Harassment is all too common on Twitter. We have a few ideas the network can use to become a safer space.
Join us:
Facebook

Twitter

Pinterest

Tumblr

LinkedIn

Google+