What's the benefit of moving to DART development away from Javascript?

jlister

Microsoft wants to move away from Javascript, but Google is sinking more investment into developing Javascript to make it run better and have more modern features. I have a good deal of experience with Microsoft's .Net development environment, and am interested in their new language DART, but I'm wondering if it's going to be as marginal as some of the other "hot new languages" that seem to catch on for a year or two, and then fall off a cliff. Should I jump in with both feet into DART, or continue my work with Javascript?

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AppDevGuy
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I would stick with Javascript for the time being, and follow closely Intel's progress with River Trail, some new extensions to Javascript that will allow it to process much faster when used for such cpu-intensive processes as photo editing - which we're sure to see more of as application developers port their code to HTML5. The "cloudification" of productivity apps is sure to bring more pressure to bear on Microsoft, whose DART language isn't really as modern as it needs to be to handle these new challenges. If DART picks up in a couple of years because of Windows 8/Windows Phone 8 then sure, move then. But right now there's a lot more call for Javascript expertise.

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