What's the minimum sampling rate and resolution for good quality sound clips?

tswayne

When recording audio files for a website, what sampling rate and sample resolution are adequate for visitors to hear decent sound quality? I’m looking at either 8KHz, 8-bit mono or 22MHz, 16-bit stereo. I’d like to keep the file size as small as possible while still sounding reasonably good. These are mainly spoken word sound clips, there is very little music so super high fidelity is not required, but it needs to be easily understood.

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jimlynch
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High-resolution audio: everything you need to know
http://www.whathifi.com/news/high-resolution-audio-everything-you-need-t...

"But it tends to refer to audio that has a higher sampling frequency and bit depth than CD, which is 16-bit/44.1kHz. High-resolution audio files usually use a sampling frequency or 96kHz or 192kHz at 24-bit, but you can also have 88.2kHz and 176.4kHz files too.

Sampling frequency means the number of times samples are taken per second when the analogue sound waves are converted into digital. The more bits there are meanwhile, the more accurately the signal can be measured in the first place, so 16-bit to 24-bit can see a noticeable leap in quality."

ehtan
Vote Up (2)

I would go with 22MHz, 16-bit stereo, which is comparable to FM radio quality audio. 8KHz, 8-bit mono is comparable to telephone quality audio, which might get the job done but people will most likely notice the low fidelity.

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