Why did Cisco suddenly open-source H.264 codec, and what will the impact be for real time video?

kreiley

Cisco just announced that they are making H.264 open source and free for developers to implement. Will this likely have a positive or negative impact of implementation of WebRTC?

Answer this Question

Answers

2 total
jimlynch
Vote Up (7)

Cisco: We'll open-source our H.264 video code AND foot licensing bill
http://www.theregister.co.uk/2013/10/30/cisco_open_source_h264_stack/

"his situation has been a stumbling block for WebRTC, the Worldwide Web Consortium's new standard for two-way real-time audio and video communications, because obviously getting two browsers to talk to each other requires them both to speak the same language.

According to Mozilla Foundation CTO Brendan Eich, Cisco's move should soon make it possible for any application to decode H.264 video without worrying about licensing implications and without paying any additional royalties to MPEG LA.

"We are grateful for Cisco's contribution, and we will add support for Cisco's OpenH264 binary modules to Firefox soon," Eich wrote on Wednesday. "These modules will be usable by downstream distributions of Firefox, as well as by any other project. In addition, we will work with Cisco to put the OpenH264 project on a sound footing and to ensure that it is governed well."

becker
Vote Up (6)

This helps Cisco control development of the WebRTC standard, and pretty much makes it impossible for Google to ditch H.264 in Chrome. It should help make development of WebRTC, in which Cisco is heavily invested, more predictable and “Cisco friendly”. In one fell swoop, Cisco has pretty much guaranteed that H.264 will continue to be widely used for many years. It may be somewhat self serving, but in this case I think it is a win for everyone. There is a pretty good write up on GigaOM about this.
http://gigaom.com/2013/10/30/mozilla-will-add-h-264-to-firefox-as-cisco-...

Ask a question

Join Now or Sign In to ask a question.
From sign-on bonuses to long-term equity bonus incentives to perks such as paying for the lease on a new Tesla, firms are upping the ante to attract and hire elite software development talent in a tight market.
Ryan Carmack, the 9 year-old son of the famed programmer and game designer, has released Pong-clone called Angry Face
Traditional development practices used for desktop apps will not work for mobile apps, and companies must instead adopt agile development, says analyst Gartner.
A new study reveals that Java developers make the most while JavaScript programmers are the most wanted
Mark Zuckerberg’s latest app takes onerous Terms of Service to a strange new level
Using a combination of Jenkins and Circle CI, plus some Ruby and GitHub know-how, will make for a smooth process.
Want to offer extra functionality to your users based on where they are? Here's how.
With competition being as intense as ever, Google is attempting to distinguish its cloud offering by appealing directly to developers.
New data from AngelList shows the top technology choices that startups are making
GitHub has been called the 'social network for programmers.' Here's how to get started on the popular site for sharing and hosting code (and other things).
Join us:
Facebook

Twitter

Pinterest

Tumblr

LinkedIn

Google+