How much longer can citizens comment to the FCC about net neutrality regulations?

mandril

When is the deadline for making a public comment to the FCC in support of net neutrality?

Topic: Government
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cuetip
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The deadline for public comments WAS July 15, 2014. However, in light of the huge volumn of comments that was apparently too much for the FCC's servers (or perhaps they didn't pay their ISP extra for the "fast lane") the official comment period has been extended to July 18. This means you still have a chance to voice your position on the issue. Comment at the FCC's website, the preceeding number is 14-28. https://www.fcc.gov/comments 

nchristine
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Quick update. The comment period was extended to September 15, 2014 due to problems with the online submission forms. So, as of today you still can and should give your input to the FCC. Source: Computerworld

jimlynch
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Looks like cuetip has a good answer for this.

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