Will CISPA ever be permanently defeated?

StillADotcommer

It seems like an annual ritual now for some Senator and/or Congressman to reintroduce CISPA, the NSA friendly legislation to make it easier for the government to get personal information from private companies. The director of the NSA was calling for CISPA just a few weeks ago. For the children. Senators Chambliss and Feinstein obliged. One is Republican and one Democrat, so everyone has someone to be mad at, luckily. I’m going to go through the steps of calling and emailing my congressmen over this again, and hope other people will as well, but man, it seems like a Sisyphean effort at times. Any ideas how to fight CISPA more effectively?

Tags: CISPA, privacy
Topic: Government
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3 total
jimlynch
Vote Up (3)

Bad legislation hardly ever seems to go away. You know what they say: The price of liberty is eternal vigilance.

jluppino
Vote Up (1)

They will try again and again and again. At least this time it might be a little less Orwellian, according to Mother Jones. Donate to EFF, write and call your Senators and Representatives. Make sure to do some basic research before you call, so that it is clear that you are an informed voter voicing valid concerns

Faizan Ali
Vote Up (1)

"Any ideas how to fight CISPA more effectively?"

 

I have been working with a company which is foucsed on providing the internet Users cyber security, I have been interviewing many influencers on this subjects and all of them have said that the best way to hide from CISPA and NSA is to hide. You need to be smart enough to know what to share and what NOT to share on the internet. People are bent on compromising their own privacy for no reason at all and the Govt is using this oppurtunity to exploit your privacy.

 

Recently a renokned hacker Kevin Mitnick said that the best way to hide from NSA is to use a VPN. VPN can hide all your activity from these spying authorities. But it would be ignorant to say that they do not hve the tecnology to Crack it but they wouldnt spend hundreds of dollars on just  a suspicion. As long as you are not involved in a terroist activity you have nothing to be afraid off! VPNs are a must along with tor and other firewalls.

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