Can Chromebooks be used without an internet connection?

PapaRiver

As I understand it, Chromebooks essentially work “in the cloud,” That’s fine most of the time, but occasionally I do need to do work, mainly word processing, when I do not have an internet connection. Am I out of luck when I’m out of WiFi range, or can I still use a Chromebook without a connection?

Topic: Hardware
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jimlynch
Vote Up (15)

See this article:

http://blogs.computerworld.com/cloud-computing/20486/chrome-os-offline

"At this point, the notion of a Chromebook becoming a paperweight when offline is simply misconstrued. Once full offline Docs support arrives (which, again, is set to happen in a matter of weeks), the number of significant holes remaining will become very slim. Full calendar-editing functionality is still pending, and that's a bummer -- but it hardly constitutes paperweight status.

Chrome OS may be a cloud-based platform, but these days, Google's Chromebooks remain perfectly capable when they're away from the cloud."

Christopher Nerney
Vote Up (14)

You can type up a storm on the Chromebook without an Internet connection, but the device has only a minimal amount of storage, so depending on what else is on there, you may not be able to save your content until you log back on.

 

This article has a good rundown of what you can and can't do with a Chromebook.

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