Do PCs have automatic protection against overheating?

riffin

I was using my Compaq laptop literally on my lap, and running a pretty graphics intensive program. After a while, it shut down. I thought about it and realized the way I had been holding it had blocked the vents, and it was pretty warm to the touch. I waiting a little while and restarted it, and everything seems to be fine. Is there built-in protection against overheating, or is it likely I caused damage because of my slip-up?

Topic: Hardware
Answer this Question

Answers

3 total
bgwatters
Vote Up (18)

Well that is part of your issue, get it off your lap. 1st Thing is to keep the vents free and clear. If those get blocked then you have Thermal probes that kick in that once they kick in it can and will shutdown. I personally run a application that run 100% processor usage, and it sits on its regular feet with no overheating issues.

owen
Vote Up (17)

Most, perhaps all, modern CPUs have a thermistor, and if you go into your BIOS you can configure shutdowns based on temperature. You probably just crossed the factory set threshold and triggered the shutdown that is in place to protect your hardware. When I overclock Android devices, I always throttle back CPU clock speeds at set temperatures to prevent damage, i.e. at 120 degrees throttle back the CPU to 75% OEM clock speed. Oh, and as the other poster mentioned, laptops aren't really that great on your lap. :-)     

 

Here is a screenshot that shows what I'm talking about. 

 

jimlynch
Vote Up (15)

BGwatters has it right. Be sure to keep the vents open. Other than that you shouldn't have a problem if the PC is operating properly and there are no malfunctions with the hardware.

Ask a question

Join Now or Sign In to ask a question.
Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Co. said its net profit in the first quarter increased by 21 percent year-over-year on better than expected demand for smartphone chips.
Apple's inability to meet demand for its Mac Pro desktop computer has surpassed that of its most egregious Mac production problem in memory, the debacle over the all-in-one iMac of late 2012 and early 2013.
Big data analytics are driving rapid growth for public cloud computing vendors with revenues for the top 50 public cloud providers shooting up 47% in the fourth quarter last year to $6.2 billion, according to Technology Business Research Inc.
Just down the street from a cluster of venture capital firms on Silicon Valley's Sand Hill Road is the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, a sprawling, 426-acre site where researchers are pushing the boundaries in physics, chemistry and materials science.
In case it wasn't clear already, Intel and Microsoft are no longer joined at the hip. Intel is trying desperately to grow its share of the tablet market, and with Windows flunking out on those devices, Android is where it's at.
The ubiquitous USB 3.0 connector is advancing to light-speed and longer-distance data transfers thanks to optical cables from Corning that started shipping on Tuesday.
One of the first laptops with a 4K screen will go on sale from Toshiba for US$1,499.99 next week.
Lately, I've been struggling with what's clearly a first-world problem: I have too many computers.
Microsoft on Monday conceded that Google's Chrome OS and the Chromebooks the operating system powers are capable of doing real work, a reversal of its 'Scroogled' campaign that once blasted the laptops as worthless.
Join us:
Facebook

Twitter

Pinterest

Tumblr

LinkedIn

Google+

randomness