How good of an idea is it to reuse existing HDDs for new PCs as a cost savings measure in light of currently elevated drive cost

sspade

The hard drive shortage is obviously an expensive issue for companies with planned hardware upgrades. Assuming you are not going to drop the coin for a SSD, you face a 200+% increase in HDD cost. We had been looking at replacing the PCs in one department, and it's been put off to the point that waiting another 6+ months is not a good option. I found one PC supplier, Puget Systems, that will allow us to send in the hard drives that we already have and install them as primary drives in new PCs. I'm a little conflicted on this, it will take some time and effort to pull out all those HDDs and send them in, but it will still result in significant cost reduction over paying the currently elevated cost for hard drives. Do you think it is worth reusing our existing hard drives?

Topic: Hardware
Answer this Question

Answers

2 total
jimlynch
Vote Up (18)

As long as the drives are in good condition and are installed properly, sure. Why not? If you've done the math and it's a significant cost savings then it makes sense. You can always replace them with new drives later on if their costs go down to an attractive price.

Seems to me that you are being quite resourceful. You are making the most out of what you already have and that's a smart thing to do. Kudos to you.

OldHippie
Vote Up (16)

Reusing your current HDDs seems like a good example of "think globally, act locally" in dealing with the consequences of events half way around the world.  I think that it is good business and a great idea for Puget Systems to change their policies to allow this in light of the global shortage of HDDs.  If the budget is tight, that huge increase in disk cost could really have an impact on the number of machines a business can/will upgrade, and allowing reuse is a great way to attract customers while providing a real benefit to them.  In the long term, it may require more work from IT to replace the recycled drives with new drive if desired or necessary, but it seems like a reasonable trade-off.  I suppose there will be a slightly higher rate of hard drive failures from the re-used drives, after all, nothing lasts forever.  I would go for it though, if I needed to replace multiple PCs in the very near future and couldn't wait for the months it will take for supply to come back up to meet demand.

Ask a question

Join Now or Sign In to ask a question.
Apple reported its quarterly numbers on Tuesday, a mixed bag that saw profits rise up but sales fall short of the mark. Here are five takeaways from the earnings call that followed.
The standards organization has formed an 802.3 25G Ethernet study group to consider market opportunities and requirements.
Breaking up is hard to do, but could a split be in store soon for EMC and VMware?
ARM is developing its second wave of 64-bit processors as it tries to maintain its edge over Intel in smartphones and tablets.
Apple has racked up another hugely profitable quarter on sales of iPhones and Macintosh computers, though its revenue growth was slower than expected.
ARM Holdings' chip licensing business continues to grow, the company said, reporting year-on-year increases in second-quarter profit and revenue.
Researchers have concluded that those billions of connected devices could help save lives in the event of disaster, even one that knocks out the Internet
Devops could be the latest and greatest buzzword, but it could also mean big and important changes - for the better- at many organizations in how applications are built and deployed.
From productivity to playtime, offline Chromebooks aren't the useless hunks of plastic that they used to be.
Tim Cook recently said that he performs 80% of his work on an iPad--and he thinks everyone should do the same. But is that really realistic?

White Papers & Webcasts

See more White Papers | Webcasts

Join us:
Facebook

Twitter

Pinterest

Tumblr

LinkedIn

Google+

randomness