How long is your desktop replacement cycle?

dvarian

There is a bit of a debate at my work about our desktop PC replacement cycle. Currently, we are on a 5 year cycle, which I frankly think is too long, but I don’t get to make the call. This is a SMB with about 40 PCs, so we aren’t talking a Fortune 500 company here. How long is too long to hang onto PCs?

Topic: Hardware
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Christopher Nerney
Vote Up (11)

I agree that three years seems like a reasonable replacement cycle time frame. Forcing employees to work on older machines makes them frustrated and less productive. In fact, the BYOD era has underscored the importance of giving workers the tools they prefer to do their jobs. Old PCs tend not to be on the list for most employees.

TheCount
Vote Up (11)

 I think three years is about the norm, but of course it varies widely, especially with smaller businesses. I was visiting a company recently, and I saw an IBM PC AT still being used in their warehouse, which blew my mind. It also can be a false savings to extend the replacement cycle too long. Obviously, as machines wear out and become outdated, they don’t work as well, employees spent more time dealing with issues instead of being productive, IT staff is used for more frequently for repairs, and new software doesn’t always work well with old hardware.

jimlynch
Vote Up (10)

Three to five years, probably. With all the mobile devices, replacing desktops doesn't seem as important. So many people are using the mobile devices for work instead. I think the days of the desktop ruling the roost are over.

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