How often should SSDs be defragmented?

bralphye

For HDDs I've always been a very conscientious defragmenter. I understand the method of data storage is different on SSD than HDDs. Is there any difference in how defragging should be scheduled for SSDs?

Topic: Hardware
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SecTech
Vote Up (36)

Absolutely do not EVER defrag SSD's. Doing so severly shortens their life.

jimlynch
Vote Up (35)

Not according to this article:

Should You Defragment A SSD?
http://www.ghacks.net/2009/01/03/should-you-defragment-a-ssd/

"Solid State Drives can access any location on the drive in the same time. This is one of the main advantages over hard drives. This also means that there is no need to defragment a Solid State Drive ever. These drives have actually been designed to write data evenly in all sectors of the drive which the industry is calling wear leveling. Each sector of a Solid State Drive has a limited number of writes before it cannot be overwritten anymore. (this is a theoretical limit which cannot be reached in work environments)

If you did defragment your Solid State Disk you can rest assured that you did not harm it in any way. It is just that this process is not needed and that defragmentation causes lots of write processes which means that the drive will reach its write limits sooner.

No need for defragmentation is therefor another advantage of Solid State Drives."

lsmall
Vote Up (30)

The short answer to your question is that SSDs should not be defragmented.  As you noted, the method of data storage differs from that of traditional HDDs.  The HDD uses physical movement of the head to access various sectors of the disk, and thus data needs to be arranged in a sequential manner to avoid latency because of unnecessary movement.  Defragmenting is a method of achieving a sequential arrangement,  it prevents data from being physically scattered all over the HDD, and therefore minimizes latency.  SSDs do not operate in this fashion, and the SSD controller distributes data all over the drive.  There is no need to treat a SSD in the same way as a HDD, and defragmenting is completely unnecessary.

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