How well does the new Leap controler work?

ablake

Has anyone picked up one of the new Leap motion based controllers now that they are out? I thought it looked really neat in the demo videos, but of course, they would make it look as good as possible in those videos. What about in “real life”, any experiences, good or bad? Thanks.

Topic: Hardware
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jimlynch
Vote Up (9)

Leap Motion Controller review: A touchscreen interface without the touching
http://www.computerworld.com/s/article/9241119/Leap_Motion_Controller_re...

"And that's really the key issue here: In what ways is the Leap Motion Controller better than a mouse or touchscreen or keyboard? For the moment, it's not. It's more toy than tool, more science fiction than practical addition.

I do find it impressive that Leap Motion managed to pack so much functionality into such a compact package, especially given the unit's impulse-buy price. But unless you're an app developer, physically challenged computer user or gadget lover, this is one Leap not worth taking -- at least, not quite yet."

Christopher Nerney
Vote Up (6)

My children have used Leaps and said they were easy to use and a lot of fun. Reviews generally have been positive -- here's one and another - but some note that not all apps work equally well and that Leap, at least for now, is much more about entertainment than productivity.

dthomas
Vote Up (5)

We have one at my office for evaluation. Pretty good but not perfect, would be fair. It’s quite accurate most of the time, but requires a steady hand. It can also get a little tiring holding your hand in the air. I’d say as more applications become available that are specifically designed to work with the Leap, it will be more useful. As it is now, it is still pretty neat. Not a must have, but I’d still say that it’s worth having one. 

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