Tips for creating a tablet security policy

murph

We're considering introducing tablets into a small group at my company. What are some of the security issues to consider?

Topic: Hardware
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JOiseau
Vote Up (32)

Tablets are generally mobile devices, so companies should treat them with the same regard as cellphones. Since it’s a fairly new and growing market, there’s not much one can do to lock them down or wipe them remotely if they fall into the wrong hands (unlike cellphones). The first step as always is to educate your company’s employees about the importance of using strong passwords or pass phrases and to keep tabs on the physical location of the device, since it’s easy to have them stolen or misplaced.

jimlynch
Vote Up (27)

Hi murph,

Information Week had a pretty good article on mobile security issues that you might want to read:

5 Mobile Security Issues To Watch
http://www.informationweek.com/news/security/mobile/231602222

Snippet:

""A big part of the security question comes down to: How do you deal with the dual-role devices that are consumer devices on the weekend and business devices during the week?" he says.

A piece of the answer to consumer-driven IT is to look beyond the device used to interact with data and focus on the data itself, says Andrew Jaquith, a former Forrester Research analyst and the chief technology officer of Perimeter E-Security.

"The real battle for mobile devices is not on security, but on privacy and the corporate equivalent of privacy, which is data leakage," Jaquith says.
Enterprise IT needs to keep a close eye on five trends in mobile security that can help companies tame the chaos resulting from the consumerization of IT."

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