What can I do with an old laptop?

ehtan

I got a nice new laptop for Christmas (Thanks, dear!). Now I have an extra, dated, but still functional laptop, and I'm wondering what to do with it. It's a 3ish year old Windows 7 Lenovo with a 1.6Ghz CPU and 4GB of internal RAM. I don't want to just toss it, which would actually mean I have to pay the city $10 to recycle it. What do you do with your old, kinda obsolete but still usable hardware? Any ideas of what I could use it for other than a paperweight?

Topic: Hardware
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John Taylor
Vote Up (35)

Delete the main partition twice to remove all your data etc and then restart pressing f10 to boot from the hidden restore to factory default partition. Then pop the beast on Ebay for 100$ plus postage and packing, or sell it to a friend whos wife is not a generous as yours

John Taylor
Vote Up (31)

Delete the main partition twice to remove all your data etc and then restart pressing f10 to boot from the hidden restore to factory default partition. Then pop the beast on Ebay for 100$ plus postage and packing, or sell it to a friend whos wife is not a generous as yours

Christopher Nerney
Vote Up (28)

Since a laptop takes up virtually no space, and since it never hurts to have a back-up emergency computer, I'd just keep it. It's certainly good enough for working and communicating online. You also can use it as your "experimental" computer for installing an open source OS, etc. Finally, there's always someone who could really use a computer. If you have an extra, it could help somebody out.

blackdog
Vote Up (26)

I don't know what your A/V set-up is like at home, but you could also use it as a media center. We have an old laptop connected to a good but also old receiver and speakers in the basement. It works great, you can store music (although not too much on yours unless you also have some external memory), stream music/video and pipe it though a real stereo. Sounds good, you put the old laptop to use, and it's not that big of a deal if a pool cue goes through the screen.  

jimlynch
Vote Up (23)

Contact the manufacturer and see if you can get purchase credit for recycling it. I believe Apple offers this sort of recycling for free for their products. If it has value, you can get an iTunes store credit or something like that. Other manufacturers might offer something similar, or at least might recycle it for free.

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