What's the difference between USB 2.0 and 3.0?

zeeman

Also, is there backwards compatibility with USB 3.0 and 2.0?

Topic: Hardware
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jimlynch
Vote Up (25)

USB 3.0 Versus 2.0
http://news.yahoo.com/blogs/technology-blog/usb-3-0-vs-usb-2-0-much-2042...

"This year, USB 3.0 hard drives and other gadgets are finally hitting stores. You can buy them — they're real! They cost a little bit more up front, but the marketing speak promises data transfer speeds 10 times faster than the old USB 2.0 standard that you've been using for the past 10 years.

Is USB 3.0 really that much faster? And even if it's not, is it fast enough to justify the slight premium? Experts have already tested it. Here's what they discovered."

Christopher Nerney
Vote Up (23)

I found this really interesting site called Diffen that allows you to compare two things. And not just technological things (though I'll get to that): The top 5 listed on the site include "Democrat vs. Republican" and "Empathy vs. Sympathy."

 

This is Diffen's answer for USB 2.0 vs. USB 3.0. You can click on the link to compare specs, but here's the answer to your second question:

 

"USB 3.0, the latest version of USB (Universal Serial Bus), provides better speed and more efficient power management than USB 2.0. USB 3.0 is backward compatible with USB 2.0 devices; however, data transfer speeds are limited to USB 2.0 levels when these devices inter-operate."

 

 

 

 

 

 

zeeman

Thanks for the answer. I'm not sure whether I should be happy or not that you turned me on to Diffen, though. I checked it out and next thing I know I had spent almost an hour comparing random things. It would be very easy to go down the rabbit hole on that site! Buzzfeed, Redit, and Diffen could pretty much kill a day if I'm not careful!

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