What's new with the Raspberry Pi 2.0?

hughye

I just got an email saying that the Raspberry Pi was going to be updated, but it didn't have any details. I had planned on getting one since they originally came out, but just haven't gotten around to it. Does anyone know what is new and when they are coming out with the new version? Is it worth waiting for, especially considering the near inevitable shortage when they are released, or would you go with the original version?

Topic: Hardware
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jimlynch
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Upcoming board revision
http://www.raspberrypi.org/archives/1929

"In the six months since we launched Raspberry Pi, we’ve received a lot of feedback about the original board design. Over the next few weeks, we’ll be gradually rolling out a new revision 2.0 PCB which incorporates some of the most popular suggestions."

tganley
Vote Up (28)

I don't think you really need to wait on the new version.  Well, if you have a strong "buy Britannia" feeling, you should wait, because a portion of production is shifting from Communist China to the UK.  On the other hand, if you are anti-Welsh, you should buy now, because the UK ones are going to be assembled in Wales.  Other than that, it is mostly refinements, the most important being that you can run a 2.0 with a powered-USB hub.  The Raspberry Pi site has a list of all the updates:

http://www.raspberrypi.org/archives/1929 

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