Which is more important in a CPU, number of cores or higher clock speed?

rhames

Which would make more sense to look for when buying a personal laptop for general use?

Topic: Hardware
Answer this Question

Answers

3 total
nchristine
Vote Up (21)

I would say clock speed, which will be felt in almost everything you do, although if you are buying a new machine, the ones with faster CPUs are probably also going to have more cores anyway. 

jimlynch
Vote Up (17)

For general use, I'd say don't worry too much about either. It's different if you are a gamer, or you need to run high-powered apps, but if you are just doing email or word processing or social media, then you shouldn't really need to worry about either.

johanaparker
Vote Up (17)

It's completely depend on need. Multiple cores are good for some things, higher clock speeds for others. There are two basic situations that are to be considered:

 

1. The processor is used with a computer that solely does calculations for a single program

 

2. The processor is used for multiple programs running at the same time

 

The first situation is where processor 'speed' is more important, as the user wants the ability to make calculations quickly and efficiently. 

 

The second is where multiple cores come in handy, as each program can be assigned to a separate core, thus freeing each program from 'bottle-necking' each other. 

 

Source: superuser

Ask a question

Join Now or Sign In to ask a question.
Researchers have concluded that those billions of connected devices could help save lives in the event of disaster, even one that knocks out the Internet
Devops could be the latest and greatest buzzword, but it could also mean big and important changes - for the better- at many organizations in how applications are built and deployed.
From productivity to playtime, offline Chromebooks aren't the useless hunks of plastic that they used to be.
Tim Cook recently said that he performs 80% of his work on an iPad--and he thinks everyone should do the same. But is that really realistic?
You hear and read the same acronyms over and over again. Let's unclutter the alphabet soup.
Apple will provide an expanded set of support services to IBM customers with iPhones and iPads under a new enterprise-grade AppleCare plan.
Yield problems are hitting the Broadwell line while unknown problems his future Atoms.
Lenovo has stopped sales of its existing small-screen Windows tablets in the U.S., but plans a new model for release by the end of the year.
A company acquired by Google that develops robots for the U.S. military appears to have greatly reduced its dependence on government funding, suggesting a reluctance on Google's part to align itself too closely with military projects.
Cisco this week expanded its data center arrangement with Microsoft with a multiyear sales and go-to-market effort for integrated products. The deal builds upon one agreed to 15 months ago, when the two companies combined cloud offerings under their respective Cisco Unified Data Center and Microsoft Fast Track 3.0 architectures.
Join us:
Facebook

Twitter

Pinterest

Tumblr

LinkedIn

Google+

randomness