Why does DDR2 RAM cost so much?

cuetip

I was looking to get some additional memory for an old PC that is still in use to control a cutting machine, and was surprised that it is so expensive. Anyone know why DDR2 memory costs so much?

Tags: DDR2, memory, RAM
Topic: Hardware
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Answers

3 total
jimlynch
Vote Up (8)

Check NewEgg or Amazon, you might be able to find some deals on it.

kreiley
Vote Up (5)

You are probably buying NOS DDR2 memory. I'm not sure if anyone even produces it any longer, so you have a fairly limited supply of it, which drives up the price. 

Carla Manini
Vote Up (5)

The only logical answer to me is that there is fewer and fewer DDR2 memory on the market as DDR3 takes over, the factories don't mass-product DDR2 as before, so the demand for it raises its price.

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