Why shouldn’t I use a vacuum to clean the inside of a PC?

bralphye

I’ve always heard it as a rule to follow, but have never been certain why it is a bad idea to use a vacuum to clean out a dusty old PC. It’s isn’t as if there are a lot of loose components that are going to be sucked up, and I’m careful enough that I wouldn’t bang around. If one is careful, would it be ok to use a vacuum (a small household one with a soft brush attachment to be specific) to get a couple of years of dust out of a PC?

Topic: Hardware
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jimlynch
Vote Up (7)

How to Clean the Inside of a Computer
http://www.wikihow.com/Clean-the-Inside-of-a-Computer

"Is your computer making noises or humming? Is dust collecting visibly on the external fan surface? Have you gone more than two months without cleaning the inside properly? Dust inside your computer can lead to component failure, fan failure, and slow performance. Keep your machine running smoothly and safely by taking the time to dust the interior. Don't wait until a fan dies and your machine overheats!"

becker
Vote Up (6)

The main reason is because using a normal household vac will likely result in static buildup, which can damage the components inside of the case. You can get a specialized vacuum that is specifically designed not to cause a build-up of static electricity, but they are expensive and not worth it for most individual users. Just open up the case, get a can of air and gently blow it out.

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