Does Google trend of cancelling products like Reader make you less likely to try their new products and services?

jack12

Google has made it very clear that they will turn the lights off of any product they have, even if there is a substantial user base, such as existed for Reader. I’ve often been an early adopter of Google products and services, including Google+. Picnik and, yes Reader. Once I’ve integrated them into my daily routine, it can be quite disruptive to have them taken away. I think I will take more of a wait and see approach from here on before embracing anything new from Google, Anyone else feel this way?

Topic: Internet
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Christopher Nerney
Vote Up (14)

It's a pain when a product or service that you rely on every day goes away. That happened to me recently with TweetDeck, my preferred Twitter app. I switched over to HootSuite, but I miss TweetDeck.

I take a wait-and-see approach with everything Google puts out because, as a general principle, I don't like to over-rely on any digital company -- especially one so willing to pull the plug on a product or service.

kreiley
Vote Up (12)

To a degree, sure I do. On the other hand, the company still offers a lot of useful and innovative things in return for the ad revenue we each generate for them, so I won’t be stopping cold turkey anytime soon. I am hesitant to place too much reliance on a single service when I have no confidence that it will not be taken away with little warning and sometime no alternative. It also give me the distinct impression that Google really doesn’t care what users think of their decisions one way or another. After all, for most of Google’s purposes, we are not the customer, we are the product that generates the information they can use to generate revenue. 

jimlynch
Vote Up (11)

I agree, it can be hugely disruptive. But Google is like any other business, they have to cancel products sometimes. Gmail and some of the other ones are still going strong though. So if you use those, you're good to go.

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