How angry with Facebook are you for changing your email address without asking?

SilverHawk

My poor keyboard is taking a pounding right now, because I am "typing angry". I run a small company that is very specialized, and a high percentage of my customers are people I actually interact with on Facebook, and they often place orders or make inquiries just by using my email. Well, I just realized that over the weekend, Facebook switched my email address that was displayed on my Facebook page to a "@facebook.com" address. I never use that for email, and so I didn't get many of my messages over the weekend and yesterday. Because I have to have very quick turnaround, that means I have to somehow cram in an extra days work this week to catch up. Thanks a lot Facebook. Anyone else upset with Facebook over this? I realize my situation is not average, but still, it seems like a jerk move by Facebook to me. Big time. Grrrrr!

Topic: Internet
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dniblock
Vote Up (23)

Well, yeah, it is a jerk move!  I also would be willing to bet that Facebook doesn't care.  Just like they don't care about your privacy, beyond what they have to in order to avoid legal problems.  Users are not really their customers, users are their products.  They want to find every way possible to suck up information about you and make money off that.  As long as people are angry but still using Facebook, I don't think anyone there will be loosing any sleep over this.  Now if people actually started leaving in large numbers, they would take notice, because they would be loosing assets.  Until there is a viable alternative, Facebook is going to keep doing things like this - count on it.  As much as I hoped Google+ would be a viable alternative to Facebook so there would be a real reason for Facebook not to do things like this, it isn't there yet.  I'm sure that you have already figured out that it is easy to change back, you just have to go in to your settings and change it back.  After you catch it, of course.   

jimlynch
Vote Up (14)

I don't blame you, you aren't the only one who is angry. I've already decided to dump Facebook as soon as there is a viable, non-google competitor. Facebook is an incredibly arrogant company that does whatever it wants to its users. They can get away it...for now, but not forever. Sooner or later there will be other alternatives, and then Facebook will reap all the bad karma it has sown for itself.

jimlynch
Vote Up (14)

I don't blame you, you aren't the only one who is angry. I've already decided to dump Facebook as soon as there is a viable, non-google competitor. Facebook is an incredibly arrogant company that does whatever it wants to its users. They can get away it...for now, but not forever. Sooner or later there will be other alternatives, and then Facebook will reap all the bad karma it has sown for itself.

jimlynch
Vote Up (14)

I don't blame you, you aren't the only one who is angry. I've already decided to dump Facebook as soon as there is a viable, non-google competitor. Facebook is an incredibly arrogant company that does whatever it wants to its users. They can get away it...for now, but not forever. Sooner or later there will be other alternatives, and then Facebook will reap all the bad karma it has sown for itself.

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