How can any website truly be shut down in this day and age?

OldHippie

Most of us have probably seen news of Megaupload's founder and other high ranking employees being rounded up and millions of dollars worth of assets seized in New Zealand this morning based on claims of violation of US copyright laws. Putting aside any question of whether criminalization of a copyright law dispute instead of it being addressed through civil litigation is right or wrong, as a practical matter is it even possible to truly shut down an "offending" website in this day and age? I heard about this on the BBC before getting out of bed, and Megaupload is already up on a new server, albeit without domain name. While it might not be as catchy as Megaupload, it is still there. In addition part of the site is being hosted in Belize under a different domain name. Keep in mind that not only were police in New Zealand involved, so were those in Canada, Germany, Hong Kong, the UK and the Netherlands...and yet they have not completely succeeded. Have websites become the new immortals?

Topic: Internet
Answer this Question

Answers

6 total
StillADotcommer
Vote Up (20)

I really doubt it.  There are many, many websites out there that exist on the fringe on the "dark web" or "deep web".   Much of the web, perhaps even most of it, is made up of data and web pages that are hidden from search engines.  Without hyperlinks to be indexed by search engines, these site are essentially invisible, generally with the DNS passed on from individual to individual.  Many of these are benign sites, or simply abandoned and inactive pages.  However, there are also sites that exist for illegal purposes.  The person who came up with the term "deep web", Michael Bergman, published a paper in 2001 that estimated the deep web was 400 to 550 times larger than the searchable web.  That's a lot of non-indexed data.  As a practical matter, existence on the dark web means it is gone to the average user, but it does still exists and can be found by determined users.  And if the host is in Ukraine, Russia or the like, it is unlikely that anything can be done. 

jimlynch
Vote Up (18)

Who knows? Maybe for now it's still up. But never underestimate the power of the US government to go after people. Yes, there are some places where its reach is limited or fails entirely. But will that be enough to sustain sites like Megaupload?

I really don't know. It seems pretty clear that SOPA and other legislation like it are totally unnecessary. Leave it to the government to waste time, money and resources on trying to pass them though. It's what the useless idiots down in Washington DC spend their days doing after they've taken their bribes from the various wealthy business interests who actually own the US government.

Sickening.

I agree with Jim Lynch... " never underestimate the power of the US government to go after people" ...remember Enron? The US Attorneys' General threatened Andrew Fastow's wife with 10-years prison because she also signed their joint tax return if she didn't testify against her husband.   Her reward? The DoJ allowed her to serve a two-year prision term PRIOR to her husband's TEN year term so that she could watch their newborn baby instaed of giving him up to foster parents.   The US government plays for keeps.   Tim
gusmiles
Vote Up (17)

Answering your question of, Is it practical to shut down offending websites...my answer is yes, especially if it is offensive, or has been associated with criminal activity. However, we walk a fine line between overall power to do so, and keeping the Internet safe. Even with SOPA, or variant of, is passed, hackers and spammers will still find a way to manipulate the Internet for profit and there will always be an audience.

 

Dave Sumayo
Vote Up (9)

please shutdown this website phgunz.org

Russell Smith
Vote Up (6)

Genuinely offensive and dangerous websites will never be shut down because there's too much bureaucracy and lack of priority (Caring.) I dare say a half a million children between 4 to 15 get sexually abused and advertised on child porn websites the fbi refuses to acknowledge. I inadvertently came across a website (Which I won't give the address to, nor do I remember it) that showed a young 12 year old getting (You know what) while being fully nude (While doing research about "Models" on facebook and twitter (2ince they lie so much)......which I quickly copied the address of the website before getting "The fully picture" of the advertisement which I was sick over. I sent the address to the fbi. Unfortunately, it's still up. There are also sites that depict extreme abuse in every way you can think of that are advertised as "Buy this video."

It's sad that a black and red hat hacker gets prison time for hacking bank accounts etc instead of getting hired, yet the government doesn't care about dangerous websites out there. I dare say, the u.s. government doesn't want dangerous websites down because I dare say I bet they get a profit from it.

Ask a question

Join Now or Sign In to ask a question.
When not busy helping to find new treatments for cancer, IBM Watson is helping to cook up a few new dishes as well.
Facebook is testing a way to let users of its mobile app search for posts shared with them in the past.
Thanks to the cloud, the “as a service” trend is getting a little out of control
Baidu and Tencent are teaming up with a Chinese shopping mall operator in a joint venture that could steal business away from local e-commerce giant Alibaba Group.
For two years, Google has quietly been developing autonomous flying vehicles that can be used to deliver packages for disaster relief or for commerce purposes, the company revealed Thursday.
It seems like poaching drivers is par for the course in the ride-sharing industry.
IBM continues to make the case for the nascent field of cognitive computing, showing off some Watson prototypes Thursday that could help speed scientific discovery in the medical field, by scanning large volumes of literature and data far more quickly then humans can, and suggesting possible leads.
NASA migrated 65 software applications, including its flagship NASA.gov website to the cloud in 22 weeks, and the space agency is still in the midst of a massive deployment to the cloud.
The Association for Unmanned Vehicle Systems International (AUVSI), which represents the nascent commercial drone industry in the U.S., has thrown its considerable weight behind a bid by Amazon to test drones for use in the online retailer's proposed Prime Air package delivery service.
Is it crazy to pay $1300 for a Chromebook? Some reflections after a year and a half of living with Google's luxurious Pixel.
Join us:
Facebook

Twitter

Pinterest

Tumblr

LinkedIn

Google+