How can I avoid the six strikes "Copyright Alert System"?

landon

How can I keep my ISP from sanctioning/throttling my home service? I use BitTorrent quite a bit, and most, if not all of my downloads are legit. There are quite a few musicians that are available for 100% authorized download - Counting Crows being perhaps the best known, but there are many, many others. Short of stopping what I'm doing, what can I do to make sure that my ISP (which has a monopoly in my area) doesn't start forcing me to attend virtual reeducation camps and throttling my broadband speeds?

Topic: Internet
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jimlynch
Vote Up (36)

You might want to make sure that all of your file transfers are encrypted, check your BitTorrent client. Also, make sure that you only connect to encrypted peers.

This article might also be useful:

The Copyright Alert System FAQ
https://www.eff.org/deeplinks/2013/02/six-strikes-copyright-alert-system...

"It’s been a long time coming, but the copyright surveillance machine known as the Copyright Alert System (CAS) — aka “Six Strikes” — has finally launched. CAS is an agreement between major media corporations and large Internet Service Providers to monitor peer-to-peer networks for copyright infringement and target subscribers who are alleged to infringe — via everything from “educational” alerts to throttling Internet speeds. Unfortunately, the Center for Copyright Information, which is running this “educational” program, is hardly a neutral information source. So, as the participants finally begin to reveal some details, we’re here to provide an alternative."

StillADotcommer
Vote Up (33)

Use a VPN for starters. There are a number of free VPN services out there, but you might want to consider paying for additional privacy and less ads. This should do a pretty good job of keeping you out of the crosshairs of your ISP by making it pretty much impossible for them to see that you are using something like BitTorrent.

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