How much of a threat to Google is Facebook's new Graph Search?

wstark

Google prints money from it's search engine (search engine advertising to be accurate), and has for years. There have been attempts to take a piece, such as Bing, but none that have really succeeded. Could Facebook's Graph Search actually compete with Google? I'm not in love with Google, but I do love the services and products they provide for "free", and I wonder if Graph Search could impact that.

Topic: Internet
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jimlynch
Vote Up (20)

Facebook is filled with content that can only be called drivelpoop. I'd use a different word, but this is a family-friendly site. Anyway, who really cares about Facebook's search? I don't. I have an account but there's not much on there that I really care to pay attention to on a regular basis.

So no, I don't think it's much of a threat to Google.

tswayne

Hahahahhaha - drivelpoop! I have to give a hat tip to a post that cracked me up. Nice! :-)
nchristine
Vote Up (18)

I've seen figures that suggest that about 25% of total internet usage is actually Facebook (not talking bandwidth, the champ there is Netflix). That 25% or so is unavailable to Google, so there is a lot of information that up to this point has not been indexed for searches. Of course, the question remains how much of that content is relevant to people who are doing searches on the antics of Lola Belle the cat.  There is also the possibility of a backlash from people who don't really want everything they like to be searchable.

 

That said, it does pose a potential threat to Google search when combined with Bing, assuming people want "personalized" search results. This is something that Google is integrating with Google+, incidentally, but as Christopher Nerney pointed out, Google+ hasn't achieved nearly the penetration of Facebook at this point. One thing that will be difficult to overcome is the face the Google is a synonym with search, and for many people it is ingrained to use Google to search. We will see if Facebook can change that, but I don't think it will be easy. 

 

As for Google keeping things free, I expect we will continue to see some of those free offerings become paid over time anyway. Don't forget that just happened with Apps for businesses.  

Christopher Nerney
Vote Up (18)

Graph Search could compete with Google only if overall engagement on Facebook grows. But at least as of last summer, engagement was dropping.

 

I'd say Graph could be to Google in search as Google+ is to Facebook in social: A presence, but not a threat.

 

 

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