How will VoIP evolve now that Microsoft bought Skype?

JOiseau

VoIP has gone from a geeky curiosity to an essential part of business. Today VoIP is a big-money business, and like telephony itself, VoIP continues to change. How will Microsoft's purchase of Skype affect the VoIP landscape?

Tags: voip
Topic: Internet
Answer this Question

Answers

2 total
jimlynch
Vote Up (33)

Hi JOiseau,

Microsoft may be using Skype as a social media tool. Here's an interesting article that looks at why Microsoft may have been interested in Skype:

MS Plots Social Networking Stealth Attack With Skype
http://www.technewsworld.com/story/73547.html

Snippet:

"Skype could be a social networking winner once it's really ready for prime time, but it may need some tinkering to get there.

"Skype is a strong enough platform to become their social play, but the functionality isn't there yet," Zeus Kerravala, principal analyst with ZK Research, told the E-Commerce Times. "It has a few social capabilities, but it's really a chat and voice tool. Microsoft will need to put some research and development dollars into Skype. It needs email integration and data posting capabilities."

Skype is a good real-time tool, but it is still not an asynchronous one, which is a significant drawback, Kerravala noted. "Because of that, I think Microsoft is dabbling in social with the goal to be big. They still have a long way to go.""

RomanZ
Vote Up (30)

VoIP was created by companies that nobody had ever heard of, but it's already evolved into a brand-name recognition game. And the more big, well-recognized companies that move into VoIP, the more mainstream it will become. And companies like Microsoft, whose main line of business is not in the telecom realm, will continue to move into this area. The end result will inevitably be integration of VoIP into a whole new set of business and consumer applications. It's already happening. VoIP is no longer strictly a stand-alone application, it's already being incorporated (by third party companies) into Facebook, for example. We'll see things like a cloud-based wordprocessing app with versioning and unified communications, so groups of people working on an app can not only share information and work collaboratively, they will be able to launch a voice call directly from the document.

Ask a question

Join Now or Sign In to ask a question.
The Internet domain name for a country doesn't belong to that country -- nor to anyone, according to ICANN.
In response to a query from Vint Cerf, professional developers explain why they don’t feel a membership in the Association for Computing Machinery is worth the cost
Amazon.com is investing US$2 billion more in India, which is witnessing an online retail boom.
Amazon.com believes that pricing e-books at US$9.99 will boost sales by over 74 percent as the books are highly price-elastic.
Twitter more than doubled its sales in the second quarter, the company reported Tuesday, showing a strong advertising business.
Uber and Airbnb, which have already proved popular with travelers and urbanites with smartphones, have unveiled new features and links to other services designed to attract more business users.
Microsoft and IBM are gaining momentum in the cloud infrastructure services market, putting pressure on Amazon and outpacing rival Google, according to a new study.
Ericsson plans to acquire MetraTech, a vendor of billing systems based on metadata, as service providers eye new services using the Internet of Things.
Rhapsody International, which operates the Rhapsody and Napster music services, said Tuesday it plans to expand in France and Latin America as a result of deals with mobile operators SRF and Telefonica.
A configuration problem in Facebook's popular Instagram application for Apple devices could allow a hacker to hijack a person's account if they're both on the same public Wi-Fi network.
Join us:
Facebook

Twitter

Pinterest

Tumblr

LinkedIn

Google+

randomness