What do you need to start podcasting?

jack12

I was thinking about starting to do a weekly podcast. I've never done it before, but I don't want it to sound like I haven't. What equipment is needed to do it right? Any particular suggestions as to brand would be helpful too. The budget isn't unlimited, but I should be able to spend enough to get decent equipment.

Topic: Internet
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jimlynch
Vote Up (19)

Here's a helpful article to get you started.

How to Start Your Own Podcast
http://www.wikihow.com/Start-Your-Own-Podcast

"Creating, promoting, and distributing your podcast to reach an online audience of possibly millions is relatively easy. You can get your podcast online in about 5 - 10 minutes. It can help to increase the audience for your business. Podcasting is becoming more popular as many bloggers turn to the internet radio shows to get their music/message out."

Christopher Nerney
Vote Up (19)

The person who wrote this article recommends starting small. That means you need a host, a domain, and a computer with a microphone and headphones. He says you can do all that for less than $100.

 

Of course, the most important thing you need is a good idea for a podcast and a strategy for developing ideas and an audience. Once you start to 1) get better 2) grow an audience 3) become more ambitious (more than one host, guests, remote locations), you can consider buying more equipment.

 

 

jluppino
Vote Up (16)

One thing that I would add to what Christopher posted is to consider spending a little more money and get a good quality microphone and pop stopper.  There may be no need to spend $1000 plus for a Shure VP88 field mic when you are dipping your toes into podcasting, but you can get a solid studio mic like a Studio Projects B1 for around $120.  A decent mic will make the sound a lot fuller, and should last you for years.  The pop stopper will stop "pops" when you use words with hard consonants like "Ps" and "Bs" - I would put that on the must have list.     

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