What's the problem with Google+ factoring into Google search results?

TheCount

So google search results have incorporated an option to factor in what you and your friends have +ed using your Google+ profile. Some articles are claiming that this has broken Google search, twitter is freaking out, and there are news stories all over tech sites. Frankly, I don't see the harm in this. What are people getting so bent out of shape about?

Topic: Internet
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jimlynch
Vote Up (26)

Well, the good thing is that there are other search engines. Linux Mint incorporates Duck Duck Go and you might want to give it a shot instead of Google. Google still has huge market share right now in search, but that doesn't mean it will go on forever.

http://duckduckgo.com/

"DuckDuckGo is a general purpose
search engine like Google or Bing.
• Get way more instant answers
Zero-click info above the links (red box).
• Less spam and clutter
We ban those useless sites with just ads.
• Lots and lots of goodies
Special searches (tech), syntax & settings.
• Real privacy
We don't track you! (Illustrated guide.)"

jlister
Vote Up (21)

Some people are concerned that this is an example of Google using its dominant search engine status to push consumers into Google+.  I'm not buying this; if I care what search results my friends "+1ed" I'll ask them, it isn't enough to push me to Google+.  I do use Google+ already, and I don't see this being a huge mover of people.  A related complaint is that Google is not utilizing similar search results/info from Facebook and Twitter, so that it is essentially an anti-trust issue.  I'm not convinced on this point either.  Google has attempted to use results from both of those companies in the past, and they both refused Google's offer.  So now they are upset when Google uses it's own social media to drive search results.  That seems a little like a kid not wanting to share his toy, then throwing a tantrum when he sees another kid playing with his own Stretch Armstrong.  I do agree with wolfkin_'s point about the default setting including Google+ driven results, which requires users to opt-out instead of requiring them to opt-in.  At the moment the opt-out is very easy, with a button at the top of the search results page, and hopefully Google will never go the way of Facebook and hide settings in a confusing menu of account settings.   

Vote Up (19)

Far as i can tell it's basic slipperly slope stuff.

 

That is noone cares about giving us the option to factor in the google+ stuff but from there it's one slighty change then then that becomes default and then Google is deciding what you can and can't see in your search results.. which is arguably bad.

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