What's your favorite blocking analogy?

jnaze

Wil Wheaton compares blocking BitTorrent to closing freeways because bank robbers could get away. What's your favorite blocking analogy?

See article here:

http://www.itworld.com/cloud-computing/277540/bittorrent-not-always-pira...

Topic: Internet
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gabrielle
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Wheaton compares blocking BitTorrent to closing freeways because bank robbers could get away.

 

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