Which internet providers are implementing the "six strike" policy?

landon

Is there a way to find out if your ISP is doing this? I'm not too happy at the thought of the ISP I pay for doing what the MPAA and RIAA demands, and my level of confidence that the "six strikes" policy will be fair and accurate is pretty low based on the competence I've seen from my ISP. The policy, in case you haven't heard of it, is a process of throttling your internet connection based on alleged copyright infringement by anyone using your network. Key word = alleged.

Topic: Internet
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jimlynch
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Here's an article with some details about six strikes, including a list of ISPs:

Has Your ISP Joined the US “Six Strikes” Anti-Piracy Scheme?
https://torrentfreak.com/isp-six-strikes-anti-piracy-scheme-120803/

"Later this year, the Center for Copyright Information (CCI) will start to track down ‘pirates’ as part of an agreement all major U.S. Internet providers struck with the MPAA and RIAA.

The parties agreed on a system through which copyright infringers are warned that they are breaking the law. After six warnings ISPs may then take a variety of repressive measures, which include slowing down offenders’ connections and temporary disconnections.

While we’ve written a fair number of articles on the topic, many people assume that all ISPs are part of the agreement. However, this is certainly not the case. In fact, only five Internet providers have agreed to send out warnings to their customers.

In alphabetical order these are AT&T, Cablevision, Comcast, Time Warner Cable and Verizon."

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