Has your company ever cut back on telecommuting or work from home plans?

jnaze

If yes, we'd love to hear about your experiences.

http://www.mobileenterprise360.com/blogs/paulkapustka/yahoos-work-home-b...

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jimlynch
Vote Up (16)

I've been fortunate to work for companies as a full-timer or freelancer that allowed telecommuting. The ones that don't are foolish. See my column below.

No Telecommuting Allowed!
http://jimlynch.com/2009/11/19/no-telecommuting-allowed/

"Ever since my full-time gig as Community Manager for Ziff Davis Media ended back in June, I’ve been looking around for a new gig by checking various job sites. I’ve been dismayed at how many job descriptions state that you must be in the office and that telecommuters are not invited to apply.

This strikes me as incredibly shortsighted on the part of these companies, particularly if the job in question involves managing online communities or dealing with social media in general. Why on Earth would you hire for a job that requires someone who basically eats, sleeps and breathes online, and then demand they spend part of their time actually going to and from an office instead of being online and in touch with your customers?"

ttopp
Vote Up (14)

I've never had the opportunity to work from home except when I did it for myself. I found it to be a challenge to stay focused on working, to be perfectly honest. When a cat is on your desk, there is always a source of distraction nearby. 

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