What is the R programming language?

penelope

Who should learn it?

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jimlynch
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See this article:

R (programming language)
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/R_(programming_language)

"R is a free software programming language and a software environment for statistical computing and graphics. The R language is widely used among statisticians and data miners for developing statistical software[2][3] and data analysis.[3] Polls and surveys of data miners are showing R's popularity has increased substantially in recent years.[4][5][6]

R is an implementation of the S programming language combined with lexical scoping semantics inspired by Scheme. S was created by John Chambers while at Bell Labs. R was created by Ross Ihaka and Robert Gentleman[7] at the University of Auckland, New Zealand, and is currently developed by the R Development Core Team, of which Chambers is a member. R is named partly after the first names of the first two R authors and partly as a play on the name of S.[8]

R is a GNU project.[9][10] The source code for the R software environment is written primarily in C, Fortran, and R.[11] R is freely available under the GNU General Public License, and pre-compiled binary versions are provided for various operating systems. R uses a command line interface; however, several graphical user interfaces are available for use with R."

jack12
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According to Wiki, it is “widely used among statisticians and data miners for developing statistical software and data analysis.” This is another way of saying “not me”, so I know little about it, Here is the site though, that has more information: http://www.r-project.org/ 

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