Can you recommend a tool for helping us perform the change control function?

rhames

Our company will be making a great number of changes to our IT infrastructure in 2012, so we're trying to plan things out as well as possible now. Are there software tools that can help us to perform the change management function? We'd like to track the changes and how they affect various departments, as well as whatever downtime or obstacles we face implementing our changes in case we need to roll back the changes and implement previous versions/older methods.

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OldHippie
Vote Up (21)

 

If your company has never implemented a change control process, you will want to make certain that all the department leaders are onboard to learn the importance of IT Lifecycle Management. There are courses one can take, but just the Foundations course is useful to even non-IT entities which have to rely on IT to help them to migrate from old versions to new versions. You can learn a lot about IT Service Management from this site, or from the books and certification exams they sell. Do not underestimate the power of training, because it's also a team-building exercise which can encourage the communication required to make the change management function successful.

http://www.itil-officialsite.com/

 

wstark
Vote Up (15)

 

We're using Intachange and it's a little complex for non-IT people. But for managing difficult changes with lots of interdependencies, it's a critical part of successful change management.

 

Just dig the screenshot:

http://www.intasoft.net/content/images/AllChange/screenshots/crs.jpg

 

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