Could the massive lawsuit by Rockstar (Microsoft, Apple) against Google and Android device manufacturers destroy Android?

wstark

This seems like a huge escalation of the patent wars (the Reuters article about it is here)! Could this actually take down Android?

Topic: Legal
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brenden gonzalez
Vote Up (6)

no google will be fine android isnt going anywhere any time soon and google is hear to stay for a long time might seem bad but its not google has its own patents to use against all the companys there just starting a war they cant win android has 85% of the smartphone market if they took it away those comapnys would piss alot of people who love android off and would probably never buy there products again so android is staying for a long time this is just the beginging of android theres alot more to come apples just mad that android 4.4. kitkat is way better than ther ios7 update its all just jelousy.

becker
Vote Up (5)

Almost certainly not, but a win by the Rockstar consortium could result in a huge monetary reward, which would of course be passed on to consumers. It's a near certainty that a court will not order an end to the sale of Android devices. In the end, we are the ones who are going to pay. Not a dime of management compensation will be lost by anyone at any of the companies involved, no matter the outcome. Nope, it will come out of the pockets of people like WStark and Becker.

I find it funny (in an “are you serious” sort of way) that Microsoft and Apple called a truce in the patent wars with other tech companies, then forms Rockstar to continue the patent wars. I expect Google to go legally medieval and revive patent litigation against Microsoft and Apple with a vengeance. Maybe not, but that is exactly what I would do if I called the shots.

jimlynch
Vote Up (3)

It could discourage companies from releasing Android products if it raises the cost of doing so, assuming that Apple and Microsoft win their lawsuit. If that happens then Google and other companies may be forced to pay the Rock Star companies for use of their technologies in Android. That could raise the price of Android devices for consumers.

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