Could the massive lawsuit by Rockstar (Microsoft, Apple) against Google and Android device manufacturers destroy Android?

wstark

This seems like a huge escalation of the patent wars (the Reuters article about it is here)! Could this actually take down Android?

Topic: Legal
Answer this Question

Answers

3 total
becker
Vote Up (7)

Almost certainly not, but a win by the Rockstar consortium could result in a huge monetary reward, which would of course be passed on to consumers. It's a near certainty that a court will not order an end to the sale of Android devices. In the end, we are the ones who are going to pay. Not a dime of management compensation will be lost by anyone at any of the companies involved, no matter the outcome. Nope, it will come out of the pockets of people like WStark and Becker.

I find it funny (in an “are you serious” sort of way) that Microsoft and Apple called a truce in the patent wars with other tech companies, then forms Rockstar to continue the patent wars. I expect Google to go legally medieval and revive patent litigation against Microsoft and Apple with a vengeance. Maybe not, but that is exactly what I would do if I called the shots.

brenden gonzalez
Vote Up (7)

no google will be fine android isnt going anywhere any time soon and google is hear to stay for a long time might seem bad but its not google has its own patents to use against all the companys there just starting a war they cant win android has 85% of the smartphone market if they took it away those comapnys would piss alot of people who love android off and would probably never buy there products again so android is staying for a long time this is just the beginging of android theres alot more to come apples just mad that android 4.4. kitkat is way better than ther ios7 update its all just jelousy.

jimlynch
Vote Up (5)

It could discourage companies from releasing Android products if it raises the cost of doing so, assuming that Apple and Microsoft win their lawsuit. If that happens then Google and other companies may be forced to pay the Rock Star companies for use of their technologies in Android. That could raise the price of Android devices for consumers.

Ask a question

Join Now or Sign In to ask a question.
Six people have been indicted on charges of running an international ring that resold tickets bought through compromised StubHub accounts for some of New York's biggest concerts and sporting events.
Dutch intelligence services can receive bulk data that might have been obtained by the U.S. National Security Agency (NSA) through mass data interception programs, even though collecting data that way is illegal for the Dutch services, the Hague District Court ruled Wednesday.
One of the complainants in an antitrust case against Google has slammed the European Commission for apparently adopting wholesale Google's proposal to settle the case, while giving complainants no fair chance to express their views on the settlement. Meanwhile, the Commission is considering revising the terms of the settlement, according to media reports.
A California court has allowed a privacy class action suit against Google to continue, though only in part.
Two members of the British Parliament are seeking judicial review of a surveillance law that extends U.K. data retention rules and was rushed through by the government.
Researchers have concluded that those billions of connected devices could help save lives in the event of disaster, even one that knocks out the Internet
Salesforce.com recently launched a new product called Social Studio in spite of the fact that an existing, competing product had already used that name for years, marketing software vendor StrongView Systems alleges in a new trademark-infringement lawsuit.
Dutch publishers have failed in their efforts to immediately close down ebook reselling site Tom Kabinet.
Romanian and French authorities have dismantled a cybercriminal network that infected computers at money transfer outlets across Europe and used them to perform illegal transactions.
The U.K. government has pushed through a new surveillance law to replace one a European Union court said interfered with fundamental privacy rights -- but, say civil rights campaigners, the new law is worse than the one it replaces.

White Papers & Webcasts

Webcast On Demand

Transform Your IT Service Management

Sponsor: EasyVista

See more White Papers | Webcasts