How to give input on FCC’s proposed rules gutting net neutrality?

MGaluzzi

I’m very concerned that the FCC is going to create a two tiered system where we have a slow internet for companies that don’t pay ISPs extra and a fast one for companies that pay what I consider extortion to reach ISPs’ paying customers. How can I effectively make my opposition to any weakening of known to the people who make these decisions?

Topic: Legal
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jimlynch
Vote Up (6)

You can contact the FCC via this page:

http://www.fcc.gov/contact-us

owen
Vote Up (6)

I just got an email about this that suggested one other thing - call the White House and let the President know how you feel about the FCC destroying net neutrality. He nominated Tom Wheeler, and the White House can ultimately put the brakes on this fiasco. The White House telephone number is 202-456-1111. Be prepared to wait a while for a volunteer operator though.

becker
Vote Up (4)

Number one, contact your congressman or congresswoman and both senators immediately. You can get the address and telephone number for all of them by going to: http://www.usa.gov/Contact/Elected.shtml

 

You can also comment directly to the FCC on the proposed rule. Make sure to reference proceeding 14-28. https://www.fcc.gov/comments

 

Follow these steps up with an email to openinternet@fcc.gov.

 

Then give the FCC chairman, Tom Wheeler, a call at 202-418-1000

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