Has Windows Phone finally established itself as a viable choice in the mobile arena?

jack12

Windows Phone has to be pretty much an “also-ran” in the mobile market for a long time, but it seems like I’m seeing better and better hardware options lately. Still I don’t see very many Windows Phone devices out in the wild. Have they started to get any traction yet, or is it still a two horse race between Apple and Android?

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jimlynch
Vote Up (6)

No, Windows Phone remains an afterthought and an also-ran. Android and iOS reign supreme, and now Ubuntu Touch and Firefox OS are also available. There's nothing that Windows Phone offers that would make that vast market of mobile users switch to it. It's just another failed attempt by Microsoft to stay relevant in the mobile age.

AMRooke
Vote Up (4)

WP is doing much better outside of the US, apparently with good penetration into the low cost market, having passed iOS in several countries.  All of my family have been using WP for 3 years, and while it has had its share of growth pains, it appears to be heading in the right direction (OS features and apps base improving steadily).  I look forward to the day when WP has the market share to be able to get out of the carrier exclusives in the US, which I feel is by far the biggest problem that has to be overcome.  Carriers should NOT have the power to dictate features of the OS that users have access to (i.e. AT&T prevents WP from having the Data Sense app).  Carriers outside of the US don't have those exclusives, and WP is stronger outside of the US, is there a correlation there?

wstark
Vote Up (4)

Windows Phone share of the US market has nearly doubled in the past year, but that sounds a lot more impressive until you look at the numbers. The increase was from 2.6% market share in 11/12 to 4.7% in 11/13. It is still very much a niche player, and I suspect some of that increase is from people who don’t want to be in the Android/Apple world, and are transitioning from BlackBerry.

I wouldn’t count WP out though; Microsoft has very deep pockets, the OS is actually pretty good, and most of hardware is decent as well. The problem for Windows Phone is getting people to switch from Android/Apple, as Christopher said. I have liked playing around with quite a few Nokia Windows Phones, but there is no way I am going to switch from using Android devices. If Microsoft can get younger buyers started with Windows Phone instead of Android/Apple, that is how they will establish themselves in the market

Christopher Nerney
Vote Up (3)

There are two issues here: market share and phone quality. Windows phones still have single-digit market share and may never get to double digits. As for the phones themselves, from the reviews (and comments by owners) I've read online, they seem like perfectly fine smartphones. I just don't know how Microsoft will pry iPhone and Android users away from their devices.

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