How can I stop notifications of OTA updates on Android devices?

tganley

I have a rooted LG F7, and I don’t want to allow OTA updates because they can sometimes break root or otherwise cause problems. However, the update nag screen is very persistent and the only way to get rid of it that I know of is to allow the update. How can I get rid of the update notification without allowing the update?

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wstark
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Since you are rooted, you can download an app called "Disable Service" from Play Store
Install and open it, then go to System Apps>Google Services Framework.
Uncheck "SystemUpdateService" and restart your device. No more OTA updates pushed onto your device.

jimlynch
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This thread might be useful:

[How-to] Disable OTA updates on Stock + Rooted ROMs
http://forum.xda-developers.com/showthread.php?t=2249350

"I see this question come up once in a while here, and I had a similar thread on the ET4G about this so I thought I'd recreate it here for you S3 folks. I recently flashed to LJ7 to do some testing and while there was getting bugged by the OTA update, so I tried this method out and confirmed it does work on the S3 as well.

[How-to] Disable OTA updates on Stock + Rooted ROMs

1. Download FOTAKill.apk* and copy to your Phone/SD
2. Use a root explorer (such as ES Explorer) to copy the file to /system/app
3. If the update already downloaded, use your root explorer to delete it from /cache
4. reboot

If the update notice is still in the notification bar after the reboot, simply swipe it away. That should be the last time you are ever prompted to update via OTA. Even if you manually go to system update and click check now it will no longer offer you the OTA. You can simply delete the apk from /system/app to reverse this mod.

*Credit for the apk goes to the CM team and or the folks who create the gapps packages!

*If anyone would like to make a CWM flashable I would be happy to add it here and give you credit. "

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