How do you put down your Android/iPhone?

wstark

Help settle an office debate - when you set down your smartphone, should the screen be facing up or down? Over lunch, we were watching what people did "in the wild", and it isn't universal by any means. I don't want to say more and give away my bias...for the right answer.

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Vote Up (24)

For me it depends on the enviroment I am in and who is around.  I don't need everyone in the world to see who is calling or texting me.  Or even when I am recieving a text or call.  That is why I leave my EVO 4G on virbrate at all times.

jimlynch
Vote Up (22)

I have a friend who puts his phone face down. I don't know why. I never do that as I don't want to scratch my screen. I just stick mine back into my pocket when I'm not using it. That way it stays with me and I don't accidentally leave it somewhere.

Then again, I own an iPhone not an Android phone. Maybe iPhone users have more common sense or something? Ha, ha! Just kidding Android users.

Well mostly... ;)

I keep my screen protected with the Otterbox defender case for EVO 4G.  If I do not have my device/phone out it is usually on my belt clip.
sspade
Vote Up (21)

I put it down face up most of the time.  The screen is slightly recessed from the surrounding body of my phone, so I don't think it touches when placed face down though.  Which is good, because I do place it face down on occasions, such as when I am home and want to be sure to hear the ring, or once in a while when I'm playing music using the built in speaker.  The placement of that speaker pretty much dictates that it be face down if you want to hear it very well.  I do have some concerns about the screen getting scratched when it is face down, although honestly I haven't seen any problems from it on my Android.  

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