How fast are inflight WiFi data speeds?

aiden

I’ve got a pretty long flight coming up next week and was thinking of using inflight WiFi to get some work done while on the plane. Does anyone know what kind of speeds can be expected with in-flight WiFi services?

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jimlynch
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Airplane Wi-Fi Gets Up to Speed
http://online.wsj.com/news/articles/SB1000142412788732386460457906747330...

"The race for fast Internet at 30,000 feet is accelerating as airlines roll out new technologies and speedier connections—offering more productivity for business travelers but also encroaching on a rare refuge from the wired world.

Gogo Inc., GOGO -1.63% the largest provider of inflight Internet in the U.S., on Wednesday plans to unveil a system that uses a combination of satellites and cellular towers, connecting airplanes to the Web at speeds six times as fast as its current best option."

jluppino
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First of all, you probably want to make sure the flight you have offers in-flight WiFi. Not all carriers do, and many of those that do don’t offer it on every flight. The quality of service is a bigger issue that theoretical speed, and that has been a problem when I’ve used it in the past. Maybe it’s better now, but based on my experience from a year or two ago, be ready for inconsistent connections and speeds. Depending on the plane and WiFi provider, you could see anything from 432Kbps to 50Mbps...in theory. The market is dominated by Gogo at the moment, but AT&T has announced that they are entering the in-flight WiFi business.

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