I want an Ice Cream Sandwich...NOW! But how good is the new Android OS really?

sspade

I've never been happy about waiting for anyting, and now that the Galaxy Nexus is out with the new Ice Cream Sandwich OS, I want one. Now. Yesterday, actually. The only thing is I just got a new HTC Bravo pretty recently. Is it really worth dropping the money for a new smartphone, primarily just for the new OS? How impressive is ICS in actual use?

Answer this Question

Answers

3 total
jimlynch
Vote Up (36)

Here's a review of it that you might find helpful. I'm on iOS so I haven't used it, but the review seems pretty upbeat.

Android 4.0: Ice Cream Sandwich review
http://www.techradar.com/reviews/pc-mac/software/operating-systems/googl...

"We'll jump right out and say it: Ice Cream Sandwich is the step forward Android has been crying out for. It's slicker, faster and more intuitive than ever before, and Google should be applauded for improving an already decent system.

Google has offered up data management too - you'll be able to set a limit to how much data the phone uses, with warnings and updates on which apps are the most byte-hungry. This is the sort of thinking smartphone users will love."

lsmall
Vote Up (33)

 

I've been limited to reading reviews so far, but from what I've read ICS is a significant android OS evolution.  I like the idea of flicking through files, for example, a finger flick while reading an email takes you to the next (or previous) message.  Small thing, but nice.  The voice text input is supposed to be much better, although better than mediocre is damning with faint praise.  

 

One thing I find really cool and potentially useful from an everyday security standpoint is the face recognition feature.  Having my smartphone just look at me and unlike sounds really convenient.  I read that it can be fooled with a photo of your face, but at least it will keep co-workers from snagging your phone when you are away from your desk and taking photos of their feet.  Yeah, I work with some odd people. 

 

Probably the thing I'm most interested in from a practicality standpoint is the data usage function.  It is a toll that lets you see exactly how much data you are burning through, when you are doing it, and the amount used by individual apps.  Over a year, this feature alone could pay for a portion of a new ICS phone for me by preventing overages.  

 

There is an article on ICS that you might like:    

http://www.pcmag.com/article2/0,2817,2396527,00.asp#fbid=xEzz3lFTOW_

 

the210kru
Vote Up (20)

"How impressive is ICS in actual use?"

 

It is impressive as fuck.

Ask a question

Join Now or Sign In to ask a question.
New technology may soon allow you to control your phone without touching or talking to it
Cholera, malaria and the rapidly expanding threat of Ebola have hit African countries with a related health-care problem: the scourge of fake drugs.
How Apple realized it made a mistake by not offering a larger screen iPhone. Plus: Android and 64-bit, and a redditor shares his thoughts about the Samsung Galaxy Note 4.
Wi-Fi networks can be very tricky to properly design and configure, especially in the small, crowded 2.4 GHz frequency band. In addition to interference from neighboring wireless networks, capacity issues arise when there are a high number of users on the network or a high density in a certain area.
China started blocking the popular photo-sharing app Instagram on Sunday, as part of its moves to squelch any mention of the use of tear gas on pro-democracy protests in Hong Kong.
Thanks to developments like Intel's Skylake platform, we'll soon use PCs like we do our phones: always on and always connected.
Uber is pushing back against the latest legal challenge to its business, saying accusations against it and its competitors are inaccurate and need correcting.
A study of devices managed by Fiberlink's MaaS360 showed that 450 mobile devices are wiped every day as part of a security policy.
As it introduces new products over the next year, Apple's consumption of mobile DRAM will jump from 16.5% to 25% in 2015.
Chen says banks and government are coming back to BlackBerry.
Join us:
Facebook

Twitter

Pinterest

Tumblr

LinkedIn

Google+

randomness