I want an Ice Cream Sandwich...NOW! But how good is the new Android OS really?

sspade

I've never been happy about waiting for anyting, and now that the Galaxy Nexus is out with the new Ice Cream Sandwich OS, I want one. Now. Yesterday, actually. The only thing is I just got a new HTC Bravo pretty recently. Is it really worth dropping the money for a new smartphone, primarily just for the new OS? How impressive is ICS in actual use?

Answer this Question

Answers

3 total
jimlynch
Vote Up (29)

Here's a review of it that you might find helpful. I'm on iOS so I haven't used it, but the review seems pretty upbeat.

Android 4.0: Ice Cream Sandwich review
http://www.techradar.com/reviews/pc-mac/software/operating-systems/googl...

"We'll jump right out and say it: Ice Cream Sandwich is the step forward Android has been crying out for. It's slicker, faster and more intuitive than ever before, and Google should be applauded for improving an already decent system.

Google has offered up data management too - you'll be able to set a limit to how much data the phone uses, with warnings and updates on which apps are the most byte-hungry. This is the sort of thinking smartphone users will love."

lsmall
Vote Up (26)

 

I've been limited to reading reviews so far, but from what I've read ICS is a significant android OS evolution.  I like the idea of flicking through files, for example, a finger flick while reading an email takes you to the next (or previous) message.  Small thing, but nice.  The voice text input is supposed to be much better, although better than mediocre is damning with faint praise.  

 

One thing I find really cool and potentially useful from an everyday security standpoint is the face recognition feature.  Having my smartphone just look at me and unlike sounds really convenient.  I read that it can be fooled with a photo of your face, but at least it will keep co-workers from snagging your phone when you are away from your desk and taking photos of their feet.  Yeah, I work with some odd people. 

 

Probably the thing I'm most interested in from a practicality standpoint is the data usage function.  It is a toll that lets you see exactly how much data you are burning through, when you are doing it, and the amount used by individual apps.  Over a year, this feature alone could pay for a portion of a new ICS phone for me by preventing overages.  

 

There is an article on ICS that you might like:    

http://www.pcmag.com/article2/0,2817,2396527,00.asp#fbid=xEzz3lFTOW_

 

the210kru
Vote Up (12)

"How impressive is ICS in actual use?"

 

It is impressive as fuck.

Ask a question

Join Now or Sign In to ask a question.
In today's accessible technology roundup: Google wants to embed cameras in contact lenses, Apple gets a patent for a new GUI for touch devices to improve accessibility and a hacker develops a virtual cane for the blind
A fire at a Samsung facility in South Korea on Sunday resulted in a temporary outage that shut down its website and caused the company's Smart TV products to report error messages.
The U.S. Federal Communications Commission will reserve a significant amount of spectrum in its upcoming auctions of the television band for unlicensed uses such as Wi-Fi, agency officials said Friday.
Vendors will tell you that the Internet of Things (IoT) has arrived. We're here to tell you that it hasn't.
Twitter's new mobile advertising suite lets companies pitch their mobile apps in promoted tweets or place ads inside other apps.
Facebook now has its own take on location sharing -- an optional feature that periodically broadcasts people's locations to their friends.
Emergency room physicians at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center are four months into a pilot program where they are using Google's computerized eyeglasses to help treat patients.
Whether it's the first time you've picked up an iPad or the seventeenth time you've pulled out your iPhone today, there are probably still some iOS 7 features and functionality that you're not familiar with. Don't sweat it: We're here to help. We've collected some of our favorite and most useful tips and compiled them here, just for you.
Users of the new Kindle for Samsung app will get up to 12 e-books for free a year, as Samsung Electronics joins forces with Amazon.com to boost the content on its mobile devices.
Google Fiber's arrival in the metro area prompts a groundswell of interest in connecting more homes to the Internet.

White Papers & Webcasts

See more White Papers | Webcasts

Join us:
Facebook

Twitter

Pinterest

Tumblr

LinkedIn

Google+