Which should I choose: BlackBerry, iPhone, or Android?

jack45

What makes sense?

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Craig Mathias
Vote Up (53)

There is (as might be expected) no absolutely right answer here; all three are going to survive, but not necessarily in that order. But from a purely analyst's perspective here are some general thoughts:

 

·       BlackBerry will remain an enterprise favorite and remain popular in corporate-liable situations (where the company provides handset to users). The reliability, physical keyboard (which many still prefer) of the mainstream BlackBerry products, and the server-side capabilities will remain features of this line for some time, and we assume that the folks at Research in Motion will continue to upgrade their offerings. Many consumers like the BlackBerry as well, even if the products do lack the flash (pun intended in Apple's case!) and coolness of the competition.

 

·       Apple's iPhone product line redefined the handset, bringing the caché of the Mac to this class of products. Apple has also become increasingly sensitive to the needs of enterprise users, no mean feat for a product that began life as essentially the marriage of an iPod and a cell phone. But even as it promises improved reliability and freedom from viruses and such, the closed-system nature of the iPhone irks some users, and leaves the door open here for the competition.

 

·       Android recently became the most popular handset OS, and for good reason: it's based on Linux, it's open source, and it's non-proprietary and very inexpensive (cost is a key factor in the success of handsets, which have a very short shelf life). It also offers many of the benefits of the iPhone; the two systems become more alike all the time. And there are many, many Android-based handsets to choose from.

 

It does appear at present that Windows Phone 7 will not be able to catch any of these competitors, although Microsoft could throw a lot of money at this problem if they want to. But with Windows becoming less important in corporate settings, especially as tablets go mainstream and cloud and Web services become the preferred implementation vehicle for enterprise applications, it still seems unlikely that Microsoft will be part of the Top 3 anytime soon. Symbian, similarly, is on the decline now – and it was once Number 1 itself. Such is the nature of the world of mobility, though.

 

So BlackBerry will be the corporate favorite, and iPhone and Android will battle it out for top honors in the consumer space. Note all of these can handle corporate apps with no problem, and all belong on a short list for that next handset purchase.

 

And, in case you were wondering, I think Android will be Number 1, the iPhone Number 2, and BlackBerry Number 3 – until another version of Linux comes along to challenge Android, something that's not at all outside the realm of possibility!

wstark
Vote Up (44)

 

Choosing a phone is a subjective choice, no matter how objective we try to be about it. Sure, each handset maker has features that may differentiate themselves from the others:

 

Blackberry - outdated OS but great keyboard

iPhone - largest selection of apps but the phone is missing features

Android - too many devices to choose from, not as many apps as iPhone, but great integration with Google services (gmail, google voice, google maps / turn-by-turn navigation, etc)

 

but ultimately, the choice you make kind of defines how you see yourself. That's because we take our phones _everywhere_, and we put our pictures and music and select which apps we want on them, and which wallpaper, so they've become very personal. My phone is in my pocket nearly as much as my wallet.

 

jimlynch
Vote Up (42)

This is a tough question to answer since everybody's needs are different. If you are already using the iTunes ecosystem on a Mac or PC then the iPhone might be a good choice. If not then it will depend on what you are looking for and what platform meets those needs best.

I suggest doing a little bit of reading before you make your decision.

Here are some links with information about all 3 platforms:

http://www.apple.com/iphone/features/

http://us.blackberry.com/smartphones/features/

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Android_(operating_system)#Features

Vote Up (38)
sandeepseeram
Vote Up (34)

From a business perspective, BlackBerrys have dominated the corporate world for the past decade. However, the tides are slowing changing due to the release of Apple’s iPhone and of course Google’s Android operating system, which being used by many mobile-device manufacturers. As a consumer and a business user, one must be thankful that we have the power of choice. It was not too long ago when Nokia and Motorola devices ruled the marketplace and smartphones weren’t really that “smart”.

 

 

Sandeep Seeram

Suraj Pawaar
Vote Up (20)

dont think and dont worry choose android becoz its father of all os

FromMars
Vote Up (19)

Android - Lots and Lots of Free apps for all fields.

Rich Orange Whitehead
Vote Up (16)

android.

open source.

media . hotspots  tethering everything. its the future that doesnt penalise you for apple'ing.

0range.

shaillover
Vote Up (16)

iPhone is probably th best

ZoyaBennet
Vote Up (14)

I would prefer you to go with Android. Since it is the opensource there exists ease of usability. And would be the best option for different category like personal usage or business usage. There are number of free apps available in market that you can make use of.  Also Android holds the top position as of US market share.

 

http://www.androidgyan.com/2013/06/android-leads-the-market-share-in-usa.html

brendonfinch
Vote Up (3)

Depends on your needs purely and probably on your budget to some extent.  blackberry is nearly on the verge of becoming obsolete, unless and until they come out with something fab product. Rest is between android and iphone. if there is no limit on spending , then you can go for 5S, i won't suggest you to go for S5 or one. If there is a limit, then you might try any android phone. But do keep your eye on Iphone 6 release. 

compsmartphone
Vote Up (1)

Apple came out with a big screen when it was good an' ready, while many Android phones are half assed jobs. But others like Htc make awesome very well finished product.

More comparison about ios & Androird : http://comparatif-smartphone.blogspot.com/

jellyfish25
Vote Up (0)

You used to be able to say: If you want the most recent cutting edge phone in a small 4 in. form factor, Apple is the only one that has you covered. I am sad that is no longer the case

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