Why do many cheap Android tablets lack access to Google Play?

mstrauss

I was looking at a friend’s Archos tablet, and he didn’t have the app that takes you to Google Play, so he is stuck with Amazon for apps, or Archos’ sad excuse for an app store. I’ve seen a couple of other “off-brand” tablets that also lack it. Why is it missing from so many Android tablets?

Answer this Question

Answers

2 total
jimlynch
Vote Up (10)

Your best bet is to buy a Google branded product if you want to insure access to Google Play. One of the big problems with Android is fragmentation. Anybody can use Android for a tablet, but that does not mean it will provide an optimal experience.

You might want to contact those tablet manufacturers and ask them why Google Play is not offered. That's probably your best bet in finding out why they made that decision.

sspade
Vote Up (9)

There was an article in the Guardian last week that claimed Google charged hardware companies tens of thousands of dollars to get access to Play, but apparently there are some doubts about the accuracy of the article since when I back to check on it, there was a notice that it was taken down pending investigation. Aside from that, even though the code for Android is open source, I know that Google Apps (including Google Play) are not open source and the manufacturers have to be approved by Google to get them. Otherwise, Google could not set up play to recognize the specific make and model of each device and say whether apps are compatible with it.

 

Your friend may be able to root the tablet and sideload GAPPS, but he or she might brick it in the process.

Ask a question

Join Now or Sign In to ask a question.
An open-source project has released the first free application for the iPhone that scrambles voice calls, which would thwart government surveillance or eavesdropping by hackers.
Twitter more than doubled its sales in the second quarter, the company reported Tuesday, showing a strong advertising business.
Now that BlackBerry has fallen significantly behind Apple and Google in the race to offer features and third-party apps for its smartphones, the company is concentrating on providing devices that, it claims, have the strongest available security -- the killer feature for the enterprise.
New Dynamic Perspective sensors help boost cost, though display costs are minimal, IHS says.
Pushbullet is great for quick and dirty file swapping between your Windows PC and Android.
If you're looking for a place to stay where you can hole up with Netflix in the evening, avoid some of the hotel industry's biggest names.
If you like to send messages via Facebook when you're on the move, get ready to download a new app.
New York start-up goTenna has created a portable antenna that could come in handy when cellular service is unavailable.
The organizers of the FirstNet LTE public safety network have the frequencies and standards they need to build the system, and they know where the money's coming from. They know how to get there from here, but it won't be a quick trip.
IT leaders need to learn how to manage the evolving legal, privacy and compliance issues of SMAC contracts.