BOOTP does not conatin an expicit field for returning the time of day from the server to the client.

adam712

why is this not a required field in BOOTP? (RFC951)

Topic: Networking
Answer this Question

Answers

2 total
jimlynch
Vote Up (9)

Here's an interesting background article on BOOTP.

Bootstrap Protocol
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bootstrap_Protocol

"In computer networking, the Bootstrap Protocol, or BOOTP, is a network protocol used by a network client to obtain an IP address from a configuration server. The BOOTP protocol was originally defined in RFC 951.

BOOTP is usually used during the bootstrap process when a computer is starting up. A BOOTP configuration server assigns an IP address to each client from a pool of addresses. BOOTP uses the User Datagram Protocol (UDP) as a transport on IPv4 networks only.
Historically, BOOTP has also been used for Unix-like diskless workstations to obtain the network location of their boot image in addition to an IP address, and also by enterprises to roll out a pre-configured client (e.g., Windows) installation to newly installed PCs.

Originally requiring the use of a boot floppy disk to establish the initial network connection, manufacturers of network cards later embedded the protocol in the BIOS of the interface cards as well as system boards with on-board network adapters, thus allowing direct network booting.
The Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP) is a more advanced protocol for the same purpose and has superseded the use of BOOTP. Most DHCP servers also function as BOOTP servers."

becker
Vote Up (7)

RFC 951 is the basic bootstrap protocol that was designed to do little more than assign an IP address to a client along with a few other resources that could be vendor defined. I think RFC 1048 BOOTP extensions include a time offset field that specifies that time offset from UTC, but I'm not 100% certain.

Ask a question

Join Now or Sign In to ask a question.
When not busy helping to find new treatments for cancer, IBM Watson is helping to cook up a few new dishes as well.
Facebook is testing a way to let users of its mobile app search for posts shared with them in the past.
Thanks to the cloud, the “as a service” trend is getting a little out of control
Baidu and Tencent are teaming up with a Chinese shopping mall operator in a joint venture that could steal business away from local e-commerce giant Alibaba Group.
For two years, Google has quietly been developing autonomous flying vehicles that can be used to deliver packages for disaster relief or for commerce purposes, the company revealed Thursday.
It seems like poaching drivers is par for the course in the ride-sharing industry.
IBM continues to make the case for the nascent field of cognitive computing, showing off some Watson prototypes Thursday that could help speed scientific discovery in the medical field, by scanning large volumes of literature and data far more quickly then humans can, and suggesting possible leads.
NASA migrated 65 software applications, including its flagship NASA.gov website to the cloud in 22 weeks, and the space agency is still in the midst of a massive deployment to the cloud.
Is it crazy to pay $1300 for a Chromebook? Some reflections after a year and a half of living with Google's luxurious Pixel.
After several years of Internet infrastructure investment, with increased local content generation and Internet users, Africa seems to be getting the attention of major global network operators and content distribution networks.
Join us:
Facebook

Twitter

Pinterest

Tumblr

LinkedIn

Google+

randomness