How to improve wifi performance?

mstrauss

I know that wired connections are faster than wifi, but since my son has been complaining about lag time when he plays games on the xbox, I'm considering wiring my living room with ethernet. But since that’s kind of messy, I was wondering if there’s a way I could boost my wifi to run faster.

Topic: Networking
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jimlynch
Vote Up (35)

Hi mstrauss,

Here's an article from PCMag that might help you out with this problem.

10 Ways to Boost Your Wireless Signal
http://www.pcmag.com/article2/0,2817,2372811,00.asp#fbid=TnX_w8LfYIg

Snippet:

"One of the most common networking questions is "How do I increase the range of my wireless connection?" There's nothing more frustrating than no connection, dropped connections, or poor throughput—all of which can be caused by a signal that's not reaching from your router to your laptop or netbook. The problem is, there are any number of reasons why the signal might be too weak.

Maybe it's sheer distance. You may have a room in your home or office that is simply too far from your wireless router. Maybe it's the layout of your home: If the signals have to bounce around too many corners to reach your endpoints, that can cause problems. Maybe it's interference with the signal. If you live in an apartment building, your home might be inundated with signals from everyone else's routers. Maybe it's structural interference. If your furnace, washing machine, and dryer are all between your router and your laptop, that doesn't help. Maybe it's the software you're using. Routers need software updates just like everything else—and sometimes the firmware they initially ship with is surprisingly buggy.

Those are just a few of the possible reasons your connection might be poor (or nonexistent). Fortunately, there are many ways to extend your wireless signal, and most of them simply involve a bit of tweaking to your wireless network or adding some affordable components. We'll walk you through ten of the most useful fixes for your connectivity woes."

lbloom
Vote Up (35)

Are you running an 802.11n router? If you’re using an older-model 802.11b or 802.11g router, by all means try replacing your old router with a newer N-compliant model with dual antennas to give you the best possible wifi performance.  Real-world performance can be as high as 300mb/s, which is of course faster than 10/100 ethernet.

zestyburgers

I agree with you Ibloom That if you are running an older model 802.11b or 802.11g router you may have a real difficult time to improve your wifi connection especially if you are using it when playing games on internet.
Vote Up (10)

Your son as a gamer is complaining about the lag/latency (time taken to send or recieve information between him and the internet as well as back again). Latency is inherent with wireless connections and there is not that much that can be done to improve it past a certain point. Wireless communication cannot achieve the same speed of signal back-and-forth as wired and this is not likely to change anytime soon.

 

Cables are indeed 'messy' when laid across the floor, but it is very easy to run a cable under the edge of the carpet or under the house. There are 'super flat' cables available that make it easy to run under a living room rug as well (http://www.maplin.co.uk/p/cat-5e-flat-network-cable-20m-n87jx). 

 

Basically, wireless internet and online games do not get along very well.

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